Experimental Brain Research

, Volume 195, Issue 2, pp 195–205

The effects of prolonged viewing of motion on short-latency ocular following responses

  • Masakatsu Taki
  • Kenichiro Miura
  • Hiromitsu Tabata
  • Yasuo Hisa
  • Kenji Kawano
Research Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00221-009-1768-7

Cite this article as:
Taki, M., Miura, K., Tabata, H. et al. Exp Brain Res (2009) 195: 195. doi:10.1007/s00221-009-1768-7
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Abstract

The adaptive effects of prolonged viewing of conditioning motion on ocular following responses (OFRs) elicited by brief test motion of a random-dot pattern were studied in humans. We found that the OFRs were significantly reduced when the directions of the conditioning and test motions were the same. The effect of conditioning motion was still observed when the speeds of the conditioning and test motions did not match. The effect was larger when the conditioning duration was longer, and decayed over time with increased temporal separation between the conditioning and test periods. These results are consistent with the characteristics of motion adaptation on the initial smooth pursuit responses. We also obtained data suggesting that the persistence of the effect depends on visual stimulation in the time between the conditioning and test periods, and that the presence of a stationary visual stimulus facilitates recovery from the motion adaptation.

Keywords

Motion adaptation Visual motion Eye movement Human Ocular following response 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masakatsu Taki
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kenichiro Miura
    • 1
  • Hiromitsu Tabata
    • 1
  • Yasuo Hisa
    • 2
  • Kenji Kawano
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Integrative Brain Science, Graduate School of MedicineKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck SurgeryKyoto Prefectural University of MedicineKyotoJapan