Experimental Brain Research

, Volume 159, Issue 2, pp 225–238

Transfer of resistance training to enhance rapid coordinated force production by older adults

Research Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00221-004-1950-x

Cite this article as:
Barry, B.K. & Carson, R.G. Exp Brain Res (2004) 159: 225. doi:10.1007/s00221-004-1950-x
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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the capacity of resistance training to enhance the rapid and coordinated production of force by older people. Thirty adults (≥60 years) completed a visually guided aiming task that required the generation of isometric torque in 2 df about the elbow prior to and following a 4-week training period. Groups of six participants were allocated to two progressive (40–100% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC)) resistance-training (PRT) groups, to two constant low-load (10% MVC) training groups (CLO) and to one no-training control group. Training movements required the generation of either combined flexion and supination (FLESUP), or combined extension and supination (EXTSUP). In response to training, target acquisition times in the aiming task decreased for all groups; however, both the nature of the training load and the training movement influenced the pattern and magnitude of improvements (EXTSUP_CLO: 36%, FLESUP_PRT 26%, EXTSUP_PRT 22%, FLESUP_CLO 20%, CONTROL 15%). For one group that trained with progressively increasing loads, there arose a subsequent decrease in performance in one condition of the transfer task. For each group, these adaptations were accompanied by systematic changes in the coordination of muscles about the elbow joint, particularly the biceps brachii.

Keywords

Ageing Strength Muscle Coordination Specificity 

Abbreviations

MVC

maximal voluntary contraction

EMG

electromyography

PRT

progressive resistance training

CLO

constant low-load training

FLESUP

flexion plus supination

EXTSUP

extension plus supination

FLEPRO

flexion plus pronation

EXTPRO

extension plus pronation

FLEX

flexion

SUPN

supination

EXTD

extension

PRON

pronation

RMS

root mean square

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Perception and Motor Systems Laboratory, School of Human Movement StudiesThe University of QueenslandSt LuciaAustralia
  2. 2.Neural Control of Movement Laboratory, Carlson 202G 354 UCB, Department of Integrative PhysiologyUniversity of ColoradoBoulder

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