Experimental Brain Research

, Volume 148, Issue 4, pp 504–508

Effect of an α1-adrenergic blocker on plasticity elicited by motor training

Authors

  • L. Sawaki
    • Human Cortical Physiology Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and StrokeNational Institutes of Health
  • K. J. Werhahn
    • Human Cortical Physiology Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and StrokeNational Institutes of Health
  • R. Barco
    • Human Cortical Physiology Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and StrokeNational Institutes of Health
  • L. Kopylev
    • Human Cortical Physiology Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and StrokeNational Institutes of Health
    • Human Cortical Physiology Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and StrokeNational Institutes of Health
    • Building 10, Room 5 N 234National Institutes of Health
Research Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00221-002-1328-x

Cite this article as:
Sawaki, L., Werhahn, K.J., Barco, R. et al. Exp Brain Res (2003) 148: 504. doi:10.1007/s00221-002-1328-x

Abstract

Recovery of motor function elicited by motor training after cortical lesions in rats is enhanced by norepinephrine (neurotransmitter mediating α1-adrenergic function) and downregulated by α1-adrenergic antagonists. In spite of this, α1-adrenergic antagonists are used to treat elderly patients with hypertension and prostate hyperplasia in stroke settings. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a single oral dose of the α1-adrenergic antagonist prazosin on training-dependent plasticity in intact humans, a function thought to contribute to recovery of motor function after cortical lesions. We report that prazosin decreased the ability of motor training to elicit training-dependent plasticity relative to a drug-free condition. These data suggest caution when using α1-adrenergic blockers in rehabilitative clinical settings following brain lesions.

Keywords

Plasticity Motor training Transcranial magnetic stimulation Learning Stroke

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2003