European Food Research and Technology

, Volume 212, Issue 3, pp 319–328

Investigation of plant extracts for the protection of processed foods against lipid oxidation. Comparison of antioxidant assays based on radical scavenging, lipid oxidation and analysis of the principal antioxidant compounds

  • K. Schwarz
  • Grete Bertelsen
  • Lise R. Nissen
  • Peter T. Gardner
  • Marina I. Heinonen
  • Anu Hopia
  • Tuong Huynh-Ba
  • Pierre Lambelet
  • Donald McPhail
  • Leif H. Skibsted
  • Lilian Tijburg
ORIGINAL PAPER

DOI: 10.1007/s002170000256

Cite this article as:
Schwarz, K., Bertelsen, G., Nissen, L. et al. Eur Food Res Technol (2001) 212: 319. doi:10.1007/s002170000256
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Abstract

 Antioxidant activities of plant extracts from spices, coffee, tea, grape skin, and tomato peel slurry were evaluated using a number of analytical methods including the quantification of principal compounds. Similar rankings in the activities of these extracts were obtained by evaluating their efficiencies as scavengers of stable free radicals: Fremy's salt, galvinoxyl or α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). Similar results were obtained with the lipid oxidation assays based on thermal acceleration (formation of conjugated dienes in methyl linoleate at 40  °C or the Rancimat test at 100  °C with lard). Rankings of the extract activity obtained by scavenging of hydroxyl radicals generated in the Fenton reaction were similar to those obtained by an oxygen consumption assay with linoleic acid as substrate and metmyoglobin as catalyst. However, the results of the latter two assays differed from those of the other assays. In the overall ranking, coffee and rosemary extracts were amongst the most potent extracts whereas the tomato peel slurry showed no activity.

Keywords Antioxidants Lipid oxidation Radical scavenging Plant extracts 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Schwarz
    • 1
  • Grete Bertelsen
    • 2
  • Lise R. Nissen
    • 2
  • Peter T. Gardner
    • 3
  • Marina I. Heinonen
    • 4
  • Anu Hopia
    • 4
  • Tuong Huynh-Ba
    • 5
  • Pierre Lambelet
    • 5
  • Donald McPhail
    • 3
  • Leif H. Skibsted
    • 2
  • Lilian Tijburg
    • 6
  1. 1.Institute of Human Nutrition and Food Science, CAU, University of Kiel, 24098 Kiel, Germany e-mail: Kschwarz@foodtech.uni-kiel.de Fax: +49-431-880-4283DE
  2. 2.Department of Dairy and Food Science, The Royal Veterinary & Agricultural University, 1958 Frederiksberg, DenmarkDK
  3. 3.The Rowett Research Institute, Division of Biochemical, Sciences, Aberdeen AB259SB, UKGB
  4. 4.Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, Food Chemistry, 00014 University of Helsinki, FinlandFI
  5. 5.Nestec Ltd., Nestlé Research Centre, PO Box 44, 1000 Lausanne 26, SwitzerlandCH
  6. 6.Unilever Research Vlaardingen, The NetherlandsNL

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