European Food Research and Technology

, Volume 228, Issue 4, pp 531–541

A PCR-microarray method for the screening of genetically modified organisms

Authors

    • Eppendorf Array Technologies SA
  • Thomas Glouden
    • Eppendorf Array Technologies SA
  • Karine Gillard
    • Eppendorf Array Technologies SA
  • Marco Mazzara
    • European Commission, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre
  • Frédéric Debode
    • Département Qualité des productions agricolesCentre wallon de recherches agronomiques (CRA-W)
  • Nicoletta Foti
    • European Commission, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre
  • Myriam Sneyers
    • Section Biosécurité et Biotechnologie (SBB)Institut Scientifique de Santé Publique (ISP)
  • Teresa Esteve Nuez
    • Consorcio CSIC-IRTA
  • Maria Pla
    • Institut de Tecnologia Agroalimentària (INTEA)
  • Gilbert Berben
    • Département Qualité des productions agricolesCentre wallon de recherches agronomiques (CRA-W)
  • William Moens
    • European Commission, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre
  • Yves Bertheau
    • Laboratoire de méthodologies de la détection des OGMINRA (Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique)
  • Colette Audéon
    • Laboratoire de méthodologies de la détection des OGMINRA (Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique)
  • Guy Van den Eede
    • European Commission, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre
  • José Remacle
    • Eppendorf Array Technologies SA
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00217-008-0960-5

Cite this article as:
Hamels, S., Glouden, T., Gillard, K. et al. Eur Food Res Technol (2009) 228: 531. doi:10.1007/s00217-008-0960-5

Abstract

A new method to screen and to identify genetically modified organisms (GMO) is presented in this paper. It is based on the detection of multiple genetic elements common to GMO by their amplification via PCR followed by direct hybridisation of the amplicons on microarray. The pattern of the elements is then compared to a database of the composition of EU-approved GMO and an identification of the GMO is then proposed. The limit of detection of the method was ≤0.1% GMO content (w/w) expressed as the amount of target DNA present in the template for single unprocessed material. The DNA targets were detected both in reference materials and in mixtures with the same detection limit. The specificity for the detection of the different elements was found to be very good with no cross-reaction even in samples with two GMO present at different concentrations. The paper presents examples of GMO identification and discusses the potential and limitation of such approaches and how they can facilitate the work of private and enforcement detection laboratories.

Keywords

GMODNA microarrayPCRScreeningDualChip GMOMultiplex

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008