Fresenius' Journal of Analytical Chemistry

, Volume 363, Issue 5, pp 562–565

The nature of corrosion products in lead pipes used to supply drinking water to the City of Glasgow, Scotland, UK

  • Nicola J. Peters
  • C. M. Davidson
  • Andrew Britton
  • Stuart J. Robertson
Conference contribution

DOI: 10.1007/s002160051247

Cite this article as:
Peters, N., Davidson, C., Britton, A. et al. Fresenius J Anal Chem (1999) 363: 562. doi:10.1007/s002160051247

Abstract

Corrosion products, obtained from lead service pipes carrying the public drinking water supply to the Glasgow area, have been characterised by FTIR spectrometry, powder x-ray diffraction spectrometry, flame atomic absorption spectrometry and ion chromatography. As expected, the products which formed in the presence of pH adjusted-water were mainly lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate. Products from areas where the water supply had been treated with orthophosphoric acid and pH adjustment for up to eight years also contained a variable proportion (up to ∼30% w/w) of a phosphate species. This has been identified as an apatite, most probably lead hydroxyapatite, Pb5(PO4)3OH.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nicola J. Peters
    • 1
  • C. M. Davidson
    • 1
  • Andrew Britton
    • 2
  • Stuart J. Robertson
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of Strathclyde, 295 Cathedral Street, Glasgow G1 1XL, UKGB
  2. 2.West of Scotland Water, 419 Balmore Road, Glasgow G22 6NU, UKGB