Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry

, Volume 407, Issue 7, pp 1819–1829

Bioavailability and biotransformation of sulforaphane and erucin metabolites in different biological matrices determined by LC–MS–MS

  • Stefanie Platz
  • Ann Liza Piberger
  • Julia Budnowski
  • Corinna Herz
  • Monika Schreiner
  • Michael Blaut
  • Andrea Hartwig
  • Evelyn Lamy
  • Laura Hanske
  • Sascha Rohn
Paper in Forefront

DOI: 10.1007/s00216-015-8482-z

Cite this article as:
Platz, S., Piberger, A.L., Budnowski, J. et al. Anal Bioanal Chem (2015) 407: 1819. doi:10.1007/s00216-015-8482-z

Abstract

The food-related isothiocyanate sulforaphane (SFN), a hydrolysis product of the secondary plant metabolite glucoraphanin, has been revealed to have cancer-preventive activity in experimental animals. However, these studies have often provided inconsistent results with regard to bioavailability, bioaccessibility, and outcome. This might be because the endogenous biotransformation of SFN metabolites to the structurally related erucin (ERN) metabolites has often not been taken into account. In this work, a fully validated liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS–MS) method was developed for the simultaneous determination of SFN and ERN metabolites in a variety of biological matrices. To reveal the importance of the biotransformation pathway, matrices including plasma, urine, liver, and kidney samples from mice and cell lysates derived from colon-cancer cell lines were included in this study. The LC–MS–MS method provides limits of detection from 1 nmol L−1 to 25 nmol L−1 and a mean recovery of 99 %. The intra and interday imprecision values are in the range 1–10 % and 2–13 %, respectively. Using LC–MS–MS, SFN and ERN metabolites were quantified in different matrices. The assay was successfully used to determine the biotransformation in all biological samples mentioned above. For a comprehensive analysis and evaluation of the potential health effects of SFN, it is necessary to consider all metabolites, including those formed by biotransformation of SFN to ERN and vice versa. Therefore, a sensitive and robust LC–MS–MS method was validated for the simultaneous quantification of mercapturic-acid-pathway metabolites of SFN and ERN.

Graphical Abstract

Biotransformation of sulforaphane and erucin metabolites in mice and cell culture

Keywords

Mass spectrometry Sulforaphane Erucin Bioactive compounds Bioavailability Biotransformation 

Abbreviations

ACN

Acetonitrile

DMEM

Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium

DMSO

Dimethyl sulfoxide

ERN

Erucin

ERN–Cys

ERN–cysteine

ERN–GSH

ERN–glutathione

ERN–NAC

ERN–N-acetylcysteine

ESI

Electrospray ionization

FA

Formic acid

GSH

Glutathione

HPLC

High-performance liquid chromatography

LC–MS–MS

Liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry

LOQ

Limit of quantification

MeOH

Methanol

NMR

Nuclear magnetic resonance

R2

Coefficient of determination

SFN

Sulforaphane

SFN–Cys

SFN–cysteine

SFN–CysGly

SFN–cysteinylglycine

SFN–NAC

SFN–N-acetylcysteine

SPE

Solid-phase extraction

TFA

Trifluoroacetic acid

Supplementary material

216_2015_8482_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (21 kb)
ESM 1(PDF 21 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stefanie Platz
    • 1
  • Ann Liza Piberger
    • 2
  • Julia Budnowski
    • 3
  • Corinna Herz
    • 4
  • Monika Schreiner
    • 5
  • Michael Blaut
    • 3
  • Andrea Hartwig
    • 2
  • Evelyn Lamy
    • 4
  • Laura Hanske
    • 3
  • Sascha Rohn
    • 1
  1. 1.Hamburg School of Food Science, Institute of Food ChemistryUniversity of HamburgHamburgGermany
  2. 2.Department of Food Chemistry and Toxicology, Institute of Applied BioscienceKarlsruhe Institute of TechnologyKarlsruheGermany
  3. 3.Department of Gastrointestinal MicrobiologyGerman Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-RehbrückeNuthetalGermany
  4. 4.Institute for Environmental Health Sciences and Hospital Infection ControlUniversity Medical CenterFreiburgGermany
  5. 5.Department of QualityLeibniz-Institute of Vegetable and Ornamental CropsGroßbeerenGermany