Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry

, Volume 407, Issue 8, pp 2329–2335

Mass spectrometry imaging of biological tissue: an approach for multicenter studies

  • Andreas Römpp
  • Jean-Pierre Both
  • Alain Brunelle
  • Ron M. A. Heeren
  • Olivier Laprévote
  • Brendan Prideaux
  • Alexandre Seyer
  • Bernhard Spengler
  • Markus Stoeckli
  • Donald F. Smith
Note

DOI: 10.1007/s00216-014-8410-7

Cite this article as:
Römpp, A., Both, JP., Brunelle, A. et al. Anal Bioanal Chem (2015) 407: 2329. doi:10.1007/s00216-014-8410-7
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Mass Spectrometry Imaging

Abstract

Mass spectrometry imaging has become a popular tool for probing the chemical complexity of biological surfaces. This led to the development of a wide range of instrumentation and preparation protocols. It is thus desirable to evaluate and compare the data output from different methodologies and mass spectrometers. Here, we present an approach for the comparison of mass spectrometry imaging data from different laboratories (often referred to as multicenter studies). This is exemplified by the analysis of mouse brain sections in five laboratories in Europe and the USA. The instrumentation includes matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-time-of-flight (TOF), MALDI-QTOF, MALDI-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR), atmospheric-pressure (AP)-MALDI-Orbitrap, and cluster TOF-secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Experimental parameters such as measurement speed, imaging bin width, and mass spectrometric parameters are discussed. All datasets were converted to the standard data format imzML and displayed in a common open-source software with identical parameters for visualization, which facilitates direct comparison of MS images. The imzML conversion also allowed exchange of fully functional MS imaging datasets between the different laboratories. The experiments ranged from overview measurements of the full mouse brain to detailed analysis of smaller features (depending on spatial resolution settings), but common histological features such as the corpus callosum were visible in all measurements. High spatial resolution measurements of AP-MALDI-Orbitrap and TOF-SIMS showed comparable structures in the low-micrometer range. We discuss general considerations for planning and performing multicenter studies in mass spectrometry imaging. This includes details on the selection, distribution, and preparation of tissue samples as well as on data handling. Such multicenter studies in combination with ongoing activities for reporting guidelines, a common data format (imzML) and a public data repository can contribute to more reliability and transparency of MS imaging studies.

Comparison of MS imaging platforms in international multicenter study

Keywords

Mass spectrometry imaging Multicenter studies Multimodal imaging Data format imzML Data handling and processing 

Supplementary material

216_2014_8410_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (2.8 mb)
ESM 1(PDF 2.80 mb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andreas Römpp
    • 1
  • Jean-Pierre Both
    • 2
  • Alain Brunelle
    • 3
  • Ron M. A. Heeren
    • 4
    • 7
  • Olivier Laprévote
    • 5
  • Brendan Prideaux
    • 6
    • 8
  • Alexandre Seyer
    • 3
    • 9
  • Bernhard Spengler
    • 1
  • Markus Stoeckli
    • 6
  • Donald F. Smith
    • 4
    • 10
  1. 1.Institute of Inorganic and Analytical ChemistryJustus Liebig UniversityGiessenGermany
  2. 2.French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA-LIST), SaclayGif-sur-Yvette cedexFrance
  3. 3.Centre de Recherche de Gif, Institut de Chimie des Substances Naturelles, CNRSGif-sur-YvetteFrance
  4. 4.FOM Institute AMOLFAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  5. 5.Chimie Toxicologie Analytique et Cellulaire, EA 4463, Faculté des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et BiologiquesUniversité Paris DescartesParisFrance
  6. 6.Novartis Institutes for BioMedical ResearchBaselSwitzerland
  7. 7.The Maastricht Multimodal Molecular Imaging institute (M4I)Maastricht UniversityMaastrichtThe Netherlands
  8. 8.Public Health Research InstituteUMDNJNewarkUSA
  9. 9.Profilomic SABoulogne-BillancourtFrance
  10. 10.National High Magnetic Field LaboratoryFlorida State UniversityTallahasseeUSA

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