Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry

, Volume 406, Issue 14, pp 3263–3277

Cellphone-based devices for bioanalytical sciences

  • Sandeep Kumar Vashist
  • Onur Mudanyali
  • E. Marion Schneider
  • Roland Zengerle
  • Aydogan Ozcan
Review

DOI: 10.1007/s00216-013-7473-1

Cite this article as:
Vashist, S.K., Mudanyali, O., Schneider, E.M. et al. Anal Bioanal Chem (2014) 406: 3263. doi:10.1007/s00216-013-7473-1
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Multiplex Platforms in Diagnostics and Bioanalytics

Abstract

During the last decade, there has been a rapidly growing trend toward the use of cellphone-based devices (CBDs) in bioanalytical sciences. For example, they have been used for digital microscopy, cytometry, read-out of immunoassays and lateral flow tests, electrochemical and surface plasmon resonance based bio-sensing, colorimetric detection and healthcare monitoring, among others. Cellphone can be considered as one of the most prospective devices for the development of next-generation point-of-care (POC) diagnostics platforms, enabling mobile healthcare delivery and personalized medicine. With more than 6.5 billion cellphone subscribers worldwide and approximately 1.6 billion new devices being sold each year, cellphone technology is also creating new business and research opportunities. Many cellphone-based devices, such as those targeted for diabetic management, weight management, monitoring of blood pressure and pulse rate, have already become commercially-available in recent years. In addition to such monitoring platforms, several other CBDs are also being introduced, targeting e.g., microscopic imaging and sensing applications for medical diagnostics using novel computational algorithms and components already embedded on cellphones. This report aims to review these recent developments in CBDs for bioanalytical sciences along with some of the challenges involved and the future opportunities.

Figure

The universal Rapid Diagnostic Test (RDT) reader developed at UCLA. It can read various lateral flow assays for point-of-care and telemedicine applications

Keywords

Cellphone Bioanalytical sciences Diagnostics Point-of-care Digital health 

Abbreviations

BP

Blood pressure

CBD

Cellphone-based device

CE

Conformité Européenne

ECG

Electrocardiogram

ELISA

Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

ESH

European Society of Hypertension

FDA

Food and Drug Administration

FOV

Field-of-view

Hb

Hemoglobin

hsCRP

High-sensitivity C-reactive protein

IF

Interstitial fluid

LED

Light-emitting diode

LFA

Lateral flow assay

LFI

Lateral flow immunoassay

mHealthcare

Mobile Healthcare

MIR

Mobile image ratiometry

MTP

Microtiter plate

NFC

Near-field communication

PCADM-1

Prostate cancer antigen diagnostic marker 1

PDMS

Polydimethylsiloxane

PfHRP

Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2

POC

Point-of-care

QD

Quantum dot

RBC

Red blood cells

RDT

Rapid diagnostic test

RFID

Radio frequency identification device

RR

Radar responsive

SNR

Signal-to-noise ratio

SPR

Surface plasmon resonance

TSH

Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH)

β2M

β2 microglobulin

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sandeep Kumar Vashist
    • 1
  • Onur Mudanyali
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • E. Marion Schneider
    • 5
  • Roland Zengerle
    • 1
    • 6
    • 7
  • Aydogan Ozcan
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.HSG-IMIT - Institut für Mikro- und InformationstechnikFreiburgGermany
  2. 2.Electrical Engineering DepartmentUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.Bioengineering DepartmentUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  4. 4.California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI)University of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  5. 5.Sektion Experimentelle AnaesthesiologieUniversity Hospital UlmUlmGermany
  6. 6.Laboratory for MEMS Applications, Department of Microsystems Engineering - IMTEKUniversity of FreiburgFreiburgGermany
  7. 7.BIOSS - Centre for Biological Signalling StudiesUniversity of FreiburgFreiburgGermany

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