Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry

, Volume 403, Issue 1, pp 27–54

Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS): progress and trends

Authors

  • Dana Cialla
    • Institute of Physical Chemistry and Abbe Center of PhotonicsFriedrich Schiller University Jena
    • Institute of Photonic Technology e.V. Jena
  • Anne März
    • Institute of Physical Chemistry and Abbe Center of PhotonicsFriedrich Schiller University Jena
  • René Böhme
    • Institute of Physical Chemistry and Abbe Center of PhotonicsFriedrich Schiller University Jena
  • Frank Theil
    • Institute of Physical Chemistry and Abbe Center of PhotonicsFriedrich Schiller University Jena
  • Karina Weber
    • Institute of Physical Chemistry and Abbe Center of PhotonicsFriedrich Schiller University Jena
    • Institute of Photonic Technology e.V. Jena
  • Michael Schmitt
    • Institute of Physical Chemistry and Abbe Center of PhotonicsFriedrich Schiller University Jena
    • Institute of Physical Chemistry and Abbe Center of PhotonicsFriedrich Schiller University Jena
    • Institute of Photonic Technology e.V. Jena
Review

DOI: 10.1007/s00216-011-5631-x

Cite this article as:
Cialla, D., März, A., Böhme, R. et al. Anal Bioanal Chem (2012) 403: 27. doi:10.1007/s00216-011-5631-x

Abstract

Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) combines molecular fingerprint specificity with potential single-molecule sensitivity. Therefore, the SERS technique is an attractive tool for sensing molecules in trace amounts within the field of chemical and biochemical analytics. Since SERS is an ongoing topic, which can be illustrated by the increased annual number of publications within the last few years, this review reflects the progress and trends in SERS research in approximately the last three years. The main reason why the SERS technique has not been established as a routine analytic technique, despite its high specificity and sensitivity, is due to the low reproducibility of the SERS signal. Thus, this review is dominated by the discussion of the various concepts for generating powerful, reproducible, SERS-active surfaces. Furthermore, the limit of sensitivity in SERS is introduced in the context of single-molecule spectroscopy and the calculation of the ‘real’ enhancement factor. In order to shed more light onto the underlying molecular processes of SERS, the theoretical description of SERS spectra is also a growing research field and will be summarized here. In addition, the recording of SERS spectra is affected by a number of parameters, such as laser power, integration time, and analyte concentration. To benefit from synergies, SERS is combined with other methods, such as scanning probe microscopy and microfluidics, which illustrates the broad applications of this powerful technique.

https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1007%2Fs00216-011-5631-x/MediaObjects/216_2011_5631_Figa_HTML.gif
Figure

Various SERS substrates visualized using scanning electron microscopy

Keywords

Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS)PlasmonicsPlasmonic arrayMicrofluidicsTip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS)Single-molecule detectionSERS enhancement factorTheoretical description of SERS spectraParameters for SERS detection

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011