Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry

, Volume 395, Issue 1, pp 185–193

Engineered 3D tissue models for cell-laden microfluidic channels

Authors

  • Young S. Song
    • Bio-Acoustic-MEMS in Medicine Lab, HST Center for BioengineeringBrigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School
  • Richard L. Lin
    • Bio-Acoustic-MEMS in Medicine Lab, HST Center for BioengineeringBrigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School
  • Grace Montesano
    • Bio-Acoustic-MEMS in Medicine Lab, HST Center for BioengineeringBrigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School
  • Naside G. Durmus
    • Department of Biomedical EngineeringBoston University
  • Grace Lee
    • Bio-Acoustic-MEMS in Medicine Lab, HST Center for BioengineeringBrigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School
  • Seung-Schik Yoo
    • Brigham and Women’s HospitalHarvard Medical School
  • Emre Kayaalp
    • Yeditepe University Faculty of Medicine
  • Edward Hæggström
    • Electronics Research Laboratory, Department of PhysicsUniversity of Helsinki
  • Ali Khademhosseini
    • Brigham and Women’s HospitalHarvard Medical School
    • Division of Health Sciences and TechnologyHarvard-MIT
    • Bio-Acoustic-MEMS in Medicine Lab, HST Center for BioengineeringBrigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School
    • Brigham and Women’s HospitalHarvard Medical School
    • Division of Health Sciences and TechnologyHarvard-MIT
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00216-009-2935-1

Cite this article as:
Song, Y.S., Lin, R.L., Montesano, G. et al. Anal Bioanal Chem (2009) 395: 185. doi:10.1007/s00216-009-2935-1

Abstract

Delivery of nutrients and oxygen within three-dimensional (3D) tissue constructs is important to maintain cell viability. We built 3D cell-laden hydrogels to validate a new tissue perfusion model that takes into account nutrition consumption. The model system was analyzed by simulating theoretical nutrient diffusion into cell-laden hydrogels. We carried out a parametric study considering different microchannel sizes and inter-channel separation in the hydrogel. We hypothesized that nutrient consumption needs to be taken into account when optimizing the perfusion channel size and separation. We validated the hypothesis by experiments. We fabricated circular microchannels (r = 400 μm) in 3D cell-laden hydrogel constructs (R = 7.5 mm, volume = 5 ml). These channels were positioned either individually or in parallel within hydrogels to increase nutrient and oxygen transport as a way to improve cell viability. We quantified the spatial distribution of viable cells within 3D hydrogel scaffolds without channels and with single- and dual-perfusion microfluidic channels. We investigated quantitatively the cell viability as a function of radial distance from the channels using experimental data and mathematical modeling of diffusion profiles. Our simulations show that a large-channel radius as well as a large channel to channel distance diffuse nutrients farther through a 3D hydrogel. This is important since our results reveal that there is a close correlation between nutrient profiles and cell viability across the hydrogel.

Keywords

3D tissue engineering Tissue perfusion Microfluidic channel Scaffold

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009