Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry

, Volume 394, Issue 1, pp 277–283

Cell separation by the combination of microfluidics and optical trapping force on a microchip

Authors

  • Masaya Murata
    • Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of EngineeringNagoya University
    • Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of EngineeringNagoya University
    • MEXT Innovative Research Center for Preventive Medical EngineeringNagoya University
  • Yeon-Su Park
    • MEXT Innovative Research Center for Preventive Medical EngineeringNagoya University
  • Noritada Kaji
    • Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of EngineeringNagoya University
    • MEXT Innovative Research Center for Preventive Medical EngineeringNagoya University
  • Manabu Tokeshi
    • Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of EngineeringNagoya University
    • MEXT Innovative Research Center for Preventive Medical EngineeringNagoya University
  • Yoshinobu Baba
    • Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of EngineeringNagoya University
    • MEXT Innovative Research Center for Preventive Medical EngineeringNagoya University
    • Plasma Nanotechnology Research CenterNagoya University
    • Health Technology Research CenterNational Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST)
    • Institute for Molecular ScienceNational Institutes of Natural Sciences
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00216-009-2648-5

Cite this article as:
Murata, M., Okamoto, Y., Park, Y. et al. Anal Bioanal Chem (2009) 394: 277. doi:10.1007/s00216-009-2648-5

Abstract

We investigated properties of cells affecting their optical trapping force and successfully established a novel cell separation method based on the combined use of optical trapping force and microfluidics on a microchip. Our investigations reveal that the morphology, size, light absorption, and refractive index of cells are important factors affecting their optical trapping force. A sheath flow of sample solutions created in a microchip made sample cells flow in a narrow linear stream and an optical trap created by a highly focused laser beam captured only target cells and altered their trajectory, resulting in high-efficiency cell separation. An optimum balance between optical trapping force and sample flow rate was essential to achieve high cell separation efficiency. Our investigations clearly indicate that the on-chip optical trapping method allows high-efficiency cell separation without cumbersome and time-consuming cell pretreatments. In addition, our on-chip optical trapping method requires small amounts of sample and may permit high-throughput cell separation and integration of other functions on microchips.

https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1007%2Fs00216-009-2648-5/MediaObjects/216_2009_2648_Figb_HTML.gif
Figure

Optical trapping in a microchannel allows high-efficiency separation of cells, e.g., dead and live HeLa cells

Keywords

Optical trappingMicrochipCell separationSheath flowTrapping force

Abbreviations

DNA

deoxyribonucleic acid

FBS

fetal bovine serum

DMEM

Dulbecco’s modified Eagle medium

UV–Vis

ultraviolet and visible

FOM

figure of merit

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009