Original Paper

Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry

, Volume 394, Issue 1, pp 277-283

First online:

Cell separation by the combination of microfluidics and optical trapping force on a microchip

  • Masaya MurataAffiliated withDepartment of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University
  • , Yukihiro OkamotoAffiliated withDepartment of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya UniversityMEXT Innovative Research Center for Preventive Medical Engineering, Nagoya University Email author 
  • , Yeon-Su ParkAffiliated withMEXT Innovative Research Center for Preventive Medical Engineering, Nagoya University
  • , Noritada KajiAffiliated withDepartment of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya UniversityMEXT Innovative Research Center for Preventive Medical Engineering, Nagoya University
  • , Manabu TokeshiAffiliated withDepartment of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya UniversityMEXT Innovative Research Center for Preventive Medical Engineering, Nagoya University
  • , Yoshinobu BabaAffiliated withDepartment of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya UniversityMEXT Innovative Research Center for Preventive Medical Engineering, Nagoya UniversityPlasma Nanotechnology Research Center, Nagoya UniversityHealth Technology Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST)Institute for Molecular Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences

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Abstract

We investigated properties of cells affecting their optical trapping force and successfully established a novel cell separation method based on the combined use of optical trapping force and microfluidics on a microchip. Our investigations reveal that the morphology, size, light absorption, and refractive index of cells are important factors affecting their optical trapping force. A sheath flow of sample solutions created in a microchip made sample cells flow in a narrow linear stream and an optical trap created by a highly focused laser beam captured only target cells and altered their trajectory, resulting in high-efficiency cell separation. An optimum balance between optical trapping force and sample flow rate was essential to achieve high cell separation efficiency. Our investigations clearly indicate that the on-chip optical trapping method allows high-efficiency cell separation without cumbersome and time-consuming cell pretreatments. In addition, our on-chip optical trapping method requires small amounts of sample and may permit high-throughput cell separation and integration of other functions on microchips.

https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1007%2Fs00216-009-2648-5/MediaObjects/216_2009_2648_Figb_HTML.gif
Figure

Optical trapping in a microchannel allows high-efficiency separation of cells, e.g., dead and live HeLa cells

Keywords

Optical trapping Microchip Cell separation Sheath flow Trapping force