Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry

, Volume 388, Issue 5, pp 1275–1282

Determination of acetone in seawater using derivatization solid-phase microextraction

Authors

  • Edward D. Hudson
    • Department of ChemistryMcGill University
  • Kadek Okuda
    • Department of ChemistryMcGill University
    • Department of ChemistryMcGill University
    • Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic SciencesMcGill University
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00216-007-1324-x

Cite this article as:
Hudson, E.D., Okuda, K. & Ariya, P.A. Anal Bioanal Chem (2007) 388: 1275. doi:10.1007/s00216-007-1324-x

Abstract

Acetone plays an important role in the chemistry of both the atmosphere and the ocean, due to its potential effect on the tropospheric HOx (= HO + HO2) budget, as well as its environmental and health effects. We discuss the development of a mobile, sensitive, selective, economical and facile method for the determination of acetone in seawater. The method consists of derivatizing acetone to its pentafluorobenzyl oxime using 1,2,3,4,5-pentafluorobenzylhydroxylamine (PFBHA), followed by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). A detection limit of 3.0 nM was achieved. The buffering capacity of seawater imposes challenges in using the method’s optimum pH (3.7) on seawater samples, requiring calibration standards to be made in buffered salt water and the acidification of seawater samples and standards prior to extraction. We employed the technique for analysis of selected surface seawater samples taken on the Nordic seas during the ARK-XX/1 cruise (R.V. Polarstern). An upper limit of 5.5–9.6 nM was observed for acetone in these waters, the first acetone measurements reported for far North Atlantic and Arctic waters.

https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1007%2Fs00216-007-1324-x/MediaObjects/216_2007_1324_Figa_HTML.gif

Simplified schematic of transformations of organic compounds at the atmosphere–ocean interface

Keywords

KetonesVolatile organic compoundsGas chromatography/mass spectrometryDissolved organic carbon

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007