, Volume 387, Issue 5, pp 1831-1840
Date: 04 Jan 2007

Recent advances in surface plasmon resonance based techniques for bioanalysis

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Abstract

Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a powerful and versatile spectroscopic method for biomolecular interaction analysis (BIA) and has been well reviewed in previous years. This updated 2006 review of SPR, SPR spectroscopy, and SPR imaging explores cutting-edge technology with a focus on material, method, and instrument development. A number of recent SPR developments and interesting applications for bioanalysis are provided. Three focus topics are discussed in more detail to exemplify recent progress. They include surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy, nanoscale glassification of SPR substrates, and enzymatic amplification in SPR imaging. Through these examples it is clear to us that the development of SPR-based methods continues to grow, while the applications continue to diversify. Major trends appear to be present in the development of combined techniques, use of new materials, and development of new methodologies. Together, these works constitute a major thrust that could eventually make SPR a common tool for surface interaction analysis and biosensing. The future outlook for SPR and SPR-associated BIA studies, in our opinion, is very bright.

Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a powerful and versatile spectroscopic method for biomolecular interaction analysis (BIA) and has been well reviewed in previous years. This updated 2006 review of SPR, SPR spectroscopy, and SPR imaging explores cutting-edge technology with a focus on material, method, and instrument development. A number of recent SPR developments and interesting applications for bioanalysis are provided. Three focus topics are discussed in more detail to exemplify recent progress. They include surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy, nanoscale glassification of SPR substrates, and enzymatic amplification in SPR imaging. Through these examples it is clear to us that the development of SPR-based methods continues to grow, while the applications continue to diversify. Major trends appear to be present in the development of combined techniques, use of new materials, and development of new methodologies. Together, these works constitute a major thrust that could eventually make SPR a common tool for surface interaction analysis and biosensing. The future outlook for SPR and SPR-associated BIA studies, in our opinion, is very bright.