Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry

, Volume 386, Issue 7, pp 2255–2255

Surface complexation studied via combined grazing-incidence EXAFS and surface diffraction: arsenate on hematite (0001) and (10–12)

  • G. Waychunas
  • T. Trainor
  • P. Eng
  • J. Catalano
  • G. Brown
  • J. Davis
  • J. Rogers
  • J. Bargar
Erratum

DOI: 10.1007/s00216-006-0922-3

Cite this article as:
Waychunas, G., Trainor, T., Eng, P. et al. Anal Bioanal Chem (2006) 386: 2255. doi:10.1007/s00216-006-0922-3
The authors have found an error in Fig. 7 of the above article. Please find the correct Fig. 7 with the corresponding caption below. Throughout the article the (10–12) plane noted should have been identified as the (1–102) plane.
https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1007%2Fs00216-006-0922-3/MediaObjects/216_2006_922_Fig1_HTML.gif
Fig. 7

Possible arsenate complexation geometries for the hematite (1–102) wet surface. Top: view from above plane. Arsenates attach either to two Fe octahedra at oxygen corners, or to a single Fe octahedron edge. The edge complex appears only at the side of a growth step. Bottom: Side view of the same complexation geometries

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Waychunas
    • 1
  • T. Trainor
    • 2
  • P. Eng
    • 3
  • J. Catalano
    • 4
  • G. Brown
    • 5
  • J. Davis
    • 6
  • J. Rogers
    • 7
  • J. Bargar
    • 7
  1. 1.Lawrence Berkeley National LaboratoryBerkeleyUSA
  2. 2.University of Alaska FairbanksFairbanksUSA
  3. 3.CARSArgonne National LaboratoryArgonneUSA
  4. 4.Environmental Chemistry DivisionArgonne National LaboratoryArgonneUSA
  5. 5.Stanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  6. 6.US Geological SurveyMenlo ParkUSA
  7. 7.Stanford Synchrotron Radiation LaboratoryStanfordUSA