Psychopharmacology

, Volume 139, Issue 1, pp 2–19

The role of GABAA receptors in the acute and chronic effects of ethanol

Authors

  • A. Chistina Grobin
    • Bowles Center for Alcohol Studies, Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7178, USA
  • Douglas B. Matthews
    • Bowles Center for Alcohol Studies, Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7178, USA
  • Leslie L. Devaud
    • Bowles Center for Alcohol Studies, Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7178, USA
  • A. L. Morrow
    • Bowles Center for Alcohol Studies, Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7178, USA
REVIEW

DOI: 10.1007/s002130050685

Cite this article as:
Grobin, A., Matthews, D., Devaud, L. et al. Psychopharmacology (1998) 139: 2. doi:10.1007/s002130050685

Abstract

GABAA receptors are sensitive to ethanol in distinct brain regions and are clearly involved in the acute actions of ethanol, ethanol tolerance, ethanol dependence and ethanol self-administration. Data from a variety of perspectives such as molecular, cellular and behavioral analysis have elucidated the role of GABAA receptors in these processes. GABAA receptor activation mediates many of the behavioral effects of ethanol including motor incoordination, anxiolysis and sedation. The actions of ethanol at GABAA receptors are influenced by endogenous modulators such as the neuroactive steroids. Sensitization to these compounds influences ethanol dependence and withdrawal and may explain gender differences in the molecular effects of ethanol. Furthermore, GABAA receptors may also play a role in ethanol self-administration via the mesolimbic reward system. Ethanol tolerance and dependence may be explained, in part, by changes in the function of GABAA receptors. We have proposed that alterations in native GABAA receptor subunit assembly could alter the functional properties of these receptors. However, post-translational modifications or other post-synaptic mechanisms may also explain changes in GABAA receptor function. Genetic animal models of ethanol dependence have also identified GABAA receptor genes as likely mediators of the behavioral adaptations associated with ethanol dependence and withdrawal. A better understanding of the effects of ethanol at GABAA receptors has highlighted important potential mechanisms involved in the development of alcoholism.

Key words AlcoholNeuroactive steroidsToleranceDependenceSensitizationSelf-administrationGene expression

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998