Psychopharmacology

, Volume 151, Issue 4, pp 424–427

A PET study of brain 5-HT2 receptors and their correlation with platelet 5-HT2 receptors in healthy humans

  • Lakshmi N. Yatham
  • Meir Steiner
  • Peter F. Liddle
  • I.-Shin Shiah
  • Raymond W. Lam
  • Athanasios P. Zis
  • Margaret Coote
Rapid Communication

DOI: 10.1007/s002130000522

Cite this article as:
Yatham, L., Steiner, M., Liddle, P. et al. Psychopharmacology (2000) 151: 424. doi:10.1007/s002130000522

Abstract.

Rationale: Platelets share many properties with brain serotonergic neurons such as active 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) transport, 5-HT2 receptors, and mitochondrial monoamine oxidase. Objectives: We measured brain 5-HT2 receptors and platelet 5-HT2 receptors in healthy volunteers to determine if there was any correlation between the two measures. Methods: Ten healthy volunteers with no lifetime history of psychiatric illness or family history in first-degree relatives were recruited. 5-HT2 receptor binding was determined for each subject with positron emission tomography and [18F]setoperone scan in the brain and with 3H-LSD binding in platelets. Results: We found no significant correlation between 5-HT2 binding potential (BP) in platelets (Bmax/Kd) and a semiquantitative estimate of 5-HT2 BP in frontal, parietal, and temporal cortical regions. SPM voxel based analysis also showed no significant correlation between the 5-HT2 BP in platelets and in the brains of the study subjects. Conclusions: Brain 5-HT2 receptor binding was not significantly correlated to platelet 3H-LSD binding in healthy subjects. This raises questions about the validity of generalizing findings from platelet studies to 5-HT neurons in the brain.

5-HT2 receptor Platelet Brain PET Setoperone LSD binding 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lakshmi N. Yatham
    • 1
  • Meir Steiner
    • 2
  • Peter F. Liddle
    • 3
  • I.-Shin Shiah
    • 4
  • Raymond W. Lam
    • 1
  • Athanasios P. Zis
    • 1
  • Margaret Coote
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Mood Disorders Clinical Research Unit, The University of British Columbia, 2255 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 2A1
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
  3. 3.Division of Schizophrenia, Department of Psychiatry, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
  4. 4.Department of Psychiatry, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan