Psychopharmacology

, Volume 210, Issue 4, pp 481–488

Characterization of the dopamine receptor system in adult rhesus monkeys exposed to cocaine throughout gestation

  • Lindsey R. Hamilton
  • Paul W. Czoty
  • H. Donald Gage
  • Michael A. Nader
Original Investigation

DOI: 10.1007/s00213-010-1847-2

Cite this article as:
Hamilton, L.R., Czoty, P.W., Gage, H.D. et al. Psychopharmacology (2010) 210: 481. doi:10.1007/s00213-010-1847-2

Abstract

Rationale

Cocaine use during pregnancy is associated with alterations in the dopamine (DA) system in the fetal brain. However, little is known about the effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on the postnatal dopaminergic system.

Objectives

The objective of the study was to examine DA receptor function in adult monkeys that were prenatally exposed to cocaine.

Materials and methods

Male and female rhesus monkeys (∼13 years old) that had been prenatally exposed to cocaine (n = 10) and controls (n = 10) were used in all studies. First, DA D2-like receptor availability was assessed using positron emission tomography and the D2-like receptor radiotracer [18F]fluoroclebopride (FCP). Next, D3 receptor function was assessed by measuring quinpirole-induced yawning (0.03–0.3 mg/kg). Finally, D1-like receptor function was examined by measuring eye blinking elicited by the high-efficacy D1-like receptor agonist SKF81297 (0.3–3.0 mg/kg).

Results

There were no differences between groups or sexes in D2-like receptor availability in the caudate nucleus, putamen or amygdala. However, quinpirole elicited significantly more yawns in prenatally cocaine-exposed monkeys compared with control monkeys. A significant correlation between gestational dose of cocaine and peak effects of quinpirole was observed. In all monkeys, administration of SKF81297 elicited dose-dependent increases in eye blinks that did not differ between groups.

Conclusions

These findings suggest that prenatal cocaine exposure can have long-term effects on DA D3 receptor function in adults.

Keywords

Prenatal cocaineD2 receptorsPET imagingQuinpiroleSKF81297Rhesus monkey

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lindsey R. Hamilton
    • 1
  • Paul W. Czoty
    • 1
  • H. Donald Gage
    • 2
  • Michael A. Nader
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Physiology and PharmacologyWake Forest University School of MedicineWinston-SalemUSA
  2. 2.Department of RadiologyWake Forest University School of MedicineWinston-SalemUSA