Original Investigation

Psychopharmacology

, Volume 162, Issue 1, pp 24-28

Psychometric properties of the Subjective Well-Being Under Neuroleptics scale and the Subjective Deficit Syndrome Scale

  • L. de HaanAffiliated withDepartment of Psychiatry, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Postbox 22700, 1100 DE Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • , M. WeisfeltAffiliated withDepartment of Psychiatry, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Postbox 22700, 1100 DE Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • , P. DingemansAffiliated withDepartment of Psychiatry, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Postbox 22700, 1100 DE Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • , D. LinszenAffiliated withDepartment of Psychiatry, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Postbox 22700, 1100 DE Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • , L. WoutersAffiliated withDepartment of Psychiatry, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Postbox 22700, 1100 DE Amsterdam, The Netherlands

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Abstract

Rationale. Subjective experience of antipsychotic drugs is relevant for medication compliance and quality of life. There is, however, sparse knowledge about the assessment of subjective experience.

Objectives. To examine the internal consistency, test–retest reliability, sensitivity to medication change and concurrent validity of two test instruments: the Subjective Well-Being Under Neuroleptics (SWN) and the Subjective Deficit Syndrome Scale (SDSS).

Methods. Both instruments were used at admission and after 6 weeks of medication stabilization in 105 consecutively admitted patients diagnosed with DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edn) diagnoses of recent-onset schizophrenia, schizophreniform disorder or schizoaffective disorder.

Results. Almost all patients were capable of reproducing their subjective experience in a consistent way both before and after medication stabilization. The internal consistency of both instruments was high. The test–retest reliability was high if medication was not changed, especially for the SWN. The SWN was sensitive for changes in medication and dosage. The short form of the SWN (SWN-20 items) had comparable psychometric qualities to the original instrument (SWN-38 items). The concurrent validity of the SWN and the SDSS was good, indicating that both tests measure the same concept.

Conclusions. The assessment of subjective experience with the SWN (both versions) may be used in evaluating differential effects of anti-psychotics and dose on subjective well-being.

Subjective experience Schizophrenia Questionnaire Medication Neuroleptics