The effects of the TRPV1 receptor antagonist SB-705498 on trigeminovascular sensitisation and neurotransmission

  • G. A. Lambert
  • J. B. Davis
  • J. M. Appleby
  • B. A. Chizh
  • K. L. Hoskin
  • A. S. Zagami
ORIGINAL ARTICLE

DOI: 10.1007/s00210-009-0437-5

Cite this article as:
Lambert, G.A., Davis, J.B., Appleby, J.M. et al. Naunyn-Schmied Arch Pharmacol (2009) 380: 311. doi:10.1007/s00210-009-0437-5

Abstract

This report examines the effect of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor antagonist SB-705498 on neurotransmission and inflammation-induced sensitisation in the trigeminovascular sensory system. A single-neuron electrophysiological animal model for neurovascular head pain was used to evaluate dural and facial noxious inputs and the effects of SB-705498 administered by intravenous (i.v.) injection. Electrical and mechanical stimulation of the dura mater and the facial skin activated second-order neurons in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis of cats, with A-δ latencies. Intravenous injection of SB-705498 (2 mg kg−1) produced a slowly developing and long-lasting suppression of responses to dural and skin stimulation. Maximum suppression occurred by 1 h and reached 41% for dura and 24% for skin. Intravenous injection of drug vehicle did not produce significant suppression of responses to stimulation of either dura or skin. Intravenous injection of SB-705498 produced a brief and small rise in blood pressure and dural blood flow, which both returned to normal before suppression of the responses to stimulation became manifest. Application of “inflammatory soup” to the dura mater produced a pronounced increase in dural blood flow and induced a slowly developing increase in the responses of neurons to both electrical and mechanical stimulations of their facial and dural receptive fields. This sensitisation reached a maximum in 60–90 min, at which time responses had risen to approximately twice that of control levels seen before the application of inflammatory soup. Intravenous injection of SB-705498 subsequent to the development of sensitisation produced a slowly developing, prolonged and statistically significant reversal of the sensitisation induced by inflammatory soup. Maximum reversal of sensitisation to electrical stimulation occurred by 150–180 min, when responses had fallen to, or below, control levels. At 70–85 min following injection of SB-705498, the responses of previously sensitised neurons to mechanical stimulation of dura mater and facial receptive field had also returned to near control levels. SB-705498 was also able to prevent the development of sensitisation; application of inflammatory soup to the dura mater induced a slowly developing increase in the responses of neurons to electrical stimulation of the skin and dura mater in cats which had received an i.v. injection of vehicle for SB-705498 but not in cats which had received the active drug. Blood levels of SB-705498 were maximal immediately following i.v. injection and declined over the following 2 h. Significant brain levels of SB-705498 were maintained for up to 9 h. These results suggest that SB-705498 may be an effective suppressant and reversal agent of the sensitisation to sensory input which follows inflammation in the trigeminovascular sensory distribution but may not be particularly useful in blocking primary pain processes such as migraine headache. SB-705498 could thus potentially prevent, modify or reverse the cutaneous trigeminal allodynia seen in certain migraine conditions, especially “transformed” migraine.

Keywords

TRPV1 receptor Sensitisation Dura mater 

Abbreviations

ANOVA

Analysis of variance

BP

Blood pressure

CB1

Cannabinoid 1

CGRP

Calcitonin-gene-related peptide

GSK

GlaxoSmithKline

HR

Heart rate

i.v.

Intravenous

LTM

Low threshold mechanoreceptor

NS

Nociceptor specific

RF

Receptive field

TRPV1

Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1

WDR

Wide dynamic range

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. A. Lambert
    • 1
    • 3
  • J. B. Davis
    • 2
  • J. M. Appleby
    • 2
  • B. A. Chizh
    • 2
  • K. L. Hoskin
    • 1
  • A. S. Zagami
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Neurological SciencesUniversity of New South Wales and Prince of Wales HospitalSydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Neurology CEDDHarlowUK
  3. 3.Institute of Neurological SciencesPrince of Wales Hospital Clinical SchoolSydneyAustralia