Archives of Toxicology

, Volume 74, Issue 10, pp 587–592

Biotransformation of trichloroethylene in collagen gel sandwich cultures of rat hepatocytes

  • Karen De Smet
  • Thomas Brüning
  • Meinolf Blaszkewicz
  • Hermann M. Bolt
  • Antoine Vercruysse
  • Vera Rogiers
Toxicokinetics and Metabolism

DOI: 10.1007/s002040000176

Cite this article as:
De Smet, K., Brüning, T., Blaszkewicz, M. et al. Arch Toxicol (2000) 74: 587. doi:10.1007/s002040000176

Abstract.

The collagen gel sandwich culture of hepatocytes has been proposed as one of the most suitable culture models available for biotransformation studies of xenobiotics. It is a complex model which imitates the cascade of enzymatic events of in vivo biotransformation and allows investigation of biological endpoints under realistic conditions. The biotransformation of trichloroethylene (TRI) has been studied in this model using rat hepatocytes. Headspace gas chromatographic measurements revealed that hepatocytes, cultured for 4 days in this in vitro system, metabolised TRI into the major oxidative metabolites trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and trichloroethanol (TCE). Cultured hepatocytes were exposed either to TRI, or to TCA and TCE. Endpoints studied were albumin secretion and the cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent enzymatic activities ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD), pentoxyresorufin O-depentylase (PROD) and N-nitrosodimethylamine demethylase (NDMA). The results show that both the parent compound and its metabolites exert specific effects on different CYP-dependent mono-oxygenase activities, as seen in vivo. It is suggested that collagen gel sandwich cultures represent a useful in vitro model for the investigation of metabolism-linked toxicity studies.

Rat hepatocytes Collagen gel Trichloroethylene In vitro model

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karen De Smet
    • 1
  • Thomas Brüning
    • 2
  • Meinolf Blaszkewicz
    • 2
  • Hermann M. Bolt
    • 2
  • Antoine Vercruysse
    • 1
  • Vera Rogiers
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Toxicology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090, Brussels, Belgium
  2. 2.Institut für Arbeitsphysiologie an der Universität Dortmund, Ardeystrasse 67, 44139 Dortmund, Germany
  3. 3.RED Laboratories, Kranenberg 6, 1731 Zellik, Belgium