Molecular Toxicology

Archives of Toxicology

, 82:933

First online:

Munich Oktoberfest experience: remarkable impact of sex and age in ethanol intoxication

  • C. BinnerAffiliated withDivision of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Heart Center Leipzig of the University of Leipzig
  • , S. SelinskiAffiliated withDepartment of Statistics, Collaborative Research Center 475, University of Dortmund
  • , M. J. BaryschAffiliated withCenter of Toxicology, Institute of Legal Medicine and Rudolf Boehm Institute, University of Leipzig
  • , C. PölcherAffiliated withDepartment of Anaesthesiology, Charité, University Hospital Berlin
  • , Wiebke SchormannAffiliated withLeibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors (IfADo), University of Dortmund
  • , Matthias HermesAffiliated withLeibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors (IfADo), University of Dortmund
  • , Marc BrulportAffiliated withLeibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors (IfADo), University of Dortmund
  • , Alexander BauerAffiliated withLeibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors (IfADo), University of Dortmund
  • , Claudia RudolphAffiliated withLeibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors (IfADo), University of Dortmund
    • , Essam BedawyAffiliated withLeibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors (IfADo), University of Dortmund
    • , Markus SchugAffiliated withLeibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors (IfADo), University of Dortmund
    • , Klaus GolkaAffiliated withLeibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors (IfADo), University of Dortmund
    • , D. HasencleverAffiliated withInstitute for Medical Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology (IMISE), University of Leipzig
    • , H. TrauerAffiliated withCenter of Toxicology, Institute of Legal Medicine and Rudolf Boehm Institute, University of Leipzig
    • , R. LessigAffiliated withCenter of Toxicology, Institute of Legal Medicine and Rudolf Boehm Institute, University of Leipzig
    • , H. M. BoltAffiliated withLeibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors (IfADo), University of Dortmund
    • , K. IckstadtAffiliated withDepartment of Statistics, Collaborative Research Center 475, University of Dortmund
    • , Jan Georg HengstlerAffiliated withLeibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors (IfADo), University of Dortmund Email author 

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Abstract

Approximately 5,000 of 6 million annual visitors of the Oktoberfest in Munich have to undergo medical treatment. Patients with alcohol intoxication without trauma or further complications are all treated in a specialized medical camp. We studied these patients in order to identify risk factors and to assess the relevance of the Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) and of ethanol blood concentrations for patient management. In 2004 totally 405 patients suffering from ethanol intoxication without trauma were treated in the medical camp. A complete set of the following data was obtained from all 405 patients: GCS, ethanol blood concentration, age, sex, blood pressure (mean, systolic and diastolic), body temperature, heart rate, blood sugar, GOT, γ-GT, and CK. A multivariate logistic regression model was applied to identify risk factors predicting patients at increased risk of hospitalization. Low GCS (≤8 vs. >8, OR: 4.18, CI: 1.96–8.65) low age (20–29 vs. ≥30 years, OR: 2.35, CI: 1.05–5.65) and male gender (male vs. female, OR: 3.58, CI: 1.36–9.34) independently predicted patients that had to be hospitalized. All other parameters including ethanol blood concentrations were not explanatory. Patients with GCS ≤ 8 (n = 66) had a lower median blood pressure (P = 0.0312) and showed a smaller increase in blood pressure during the observation period compared to patients with GCS > 8 (P < 0.001), suggesting that this subgroup may require longer recovery periods. Men aged 20–29 years were at highest risk for hospital admission. Increased risk could not be explained by higher ethanol blood concentrations in this subgroup. Importantly, GCS < 6 does not justify endotracheal intubation in ethanol intoxicated patients, when further complications, such as trauma, can be excluded.

Keywords

Ethanol intoxication Glasgow coma score Hospitalization Endotracheal intubation Acute alcohol intoxication