Archives of Microbiology

, Volume 175, Issue 5, pp 384–388

Study of pyoverdine type and production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cystic fibrosis patients: prevalence of type II pyoverdine isolates and accumulation of pyoverdine-negative mutations

  • Daniel De Vos
  • Magali De Chial
  • Christel Cochez
  • Silke Jansen
  • Burkhard Tümmler
  • Jean-Marie Meyer
  • Pierre Cornelis
Short Communication

DOI: 10.1007/s002030100278

Cite this article as:
De Vos, D., De Chial, M., Cochez, C. et al. Arch Microbiol (2001) 175: 384. doi:10.1007/s002030100278

Abstract.

The lungs of cystic fibrosis patients are frequently colonized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which produces high-affinity fluorescent peptidic siderophores, pyoverdines. Three pyoverdines which differ in their peptide chain and are easily differentiated by isoelectric focusing exist, only one being produced by a given strain. P. aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients of a German hospital were analyzed by sequential, pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and for pyoverdine production and type. Only producers of type I and type II pyoverdine were found. There was a perfect correlation between the type of pyoverdine produced and the clonality determined by PFGE. PFGE clone C, the most prevalent among cystic fibrosis patients, and found in an aquatic environment, produced type II pyoverdine. Pyoverdine-negative mutants seemed to increase as a function of the lung colonization time, but retained the capacity to take up pyoverdines. Most isolates that took up type II pyoverdine were also able to utilize type I pyoverdine as judged by growth stimulation experiments. No correlation was observed between the loss of pyoverdine production and mucoidy.

Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cystic fibrosis Pyoverdines 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel De Vos
    • 1
  • Magali De Chial
    • 1
  • Christel Cochez
    • 1
  • Silke Jansen
    • 3
  • Burkhard Tümmler
    • 3
  • Jean-Marie Meyer
    • 4
  • Pierre Cornelis
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Microbial Interactions, Department of Immunology, Parasitology and Ultrastructure, Flanders Interuniversity Institute of Biotechnology and Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Paardenstraat 65, 1640 Sint Genesius Rode, Belgium
  2. 2.Brandwonden Centrum, Militair Hospitaal Koningin Astrid, 1120 Brussels, Belgium
  3. 3.Klinische Forschergruppe, Zentrum Biochemie und Zentrum Kinderheilkunde, OE 6711, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, 30623 Hannover, Germany
  4. 4.Laboratoire de Microbiologie et de Génétique, Université Louis Pasteur, UPRES-A 7010, 67000 Strasbourg, France

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