Archives of Microbiology

, Volume 189, Issue 2, pp 175–179

Colonization of broilers by Campylobacter jejuni internalized within Acanthamoeba castellanii

Authors

    • School of Biomedical SciencesUniversity of Ulster
  • Norman J. Stern
    • USDA, Agricultural Research ServicePoultry Microbiological Safety Research Unit
  • Colm J. Lowery
    • School of Biomedical SciencesUniversity of Ulster
  • John E. Moore
    • Northern Ireland Public Health Laboratory, Department of BacteriologyBelfast City Hospital
  • Emma Gibbons
    • School of Biomedical SciencesUniversity of Ulster
  • Ciara Baker
    • School of Biomedical SciencesUniversity of Ulster
  • James S. G. Dooley
    • School of Biomedical SciencesUniversity of Ulster
Short Communication

DOI: 10.1007/s00203-007-0303-0

Cite this article as:
Snelling, W.J., Stern, N.J., Lowery, C.J. et al. Arch Microbiol (2008) 189: 175. doi:10.1007/s00203-007-0303-0

Abstract

Although Campylobacter survives within amoeba in-vitro, it is unknown if intra-amoeba Campylobacter jejuni can colonize broilers. Five groups of 28 day-of-hatch chicks were placed into separate isolators. Groups (1) and (2) were challenged with page’s amoeba saline (PAS), and disinfected planktonic C. jejuni NCTC 11168, respectively. Groups (3), (4) and (5) were challenged with a C. jejuni positive control, C. jejuni in PAS, and intra-amoeba C. jejuni, respectively. After 1, 3, 7 and 14 days post challenge, seven birds from each unit were examined for C. jejuni colonization. For the first time we report that intra-amoeba C. jejuni colonized broilers.

Keywords

Campylobacter jejuniBroilersDrinking waterProtozoaEpidemiology

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007