Archives of Microbiology

, Volume 181, Issue 3, pp 245–249

Phenyl methyl ethers: novel electron donors for respiratory growth of Desulfitobacterium hafniense and Desulfitobacterium sp. strain PCE-S

  • Anke Neumann
  • Tina Engelmann
  • Roland Schmitz
  • Yvonne Greiser
  • Adelheid Orthaus
  • Gabriele Diekert
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00203-004-0651-y

Cite this article as:
Neumann, A., Engelmann, T., Schmitz, R. et al. Arch Microbiol (2004) 181: 245. doi:10.1007/s00203-004-0651-y

Abstract

Desulfitobacterium hafniense and Desulfitobacterium sp. strain PCE-S grew under anoxic conditions with a variety of phenyl methyl ethers as electron donors in combination with fumarate as electron acceptor. The phenyl methyl ethers were O-demethylated to the corresponding phenol compounds. O-demethylation was strictly dependent on the presence of fumarate; no O-demethylation occurred with CO2 as electron acceptor. One mol phenyl methyl ether R-O-CH3 was O-demethylated to R-OH per 3 mol fumarate reduced to succinate. The growth yields with vanillate or syringate plus fumarate were approximately 15 g cells (dry weight) per mol methyl moiety converted. D. hafniense utilized vanillate or syringate as an electron donor for reductive dehalogenation of 3-Cl-4-hydroxyphenylacetate, whereas strain PCE-S was not able to dechlorinate tetrachloroethene with phenyl methyl ethers. Crude extracts of both organisms showed O-demethylase activity in the O-demethylase assay with vanillate or syringate as substrates when the organism was grown on syringate plus fumarate. Besides the homoacetogenic bacteria, only growing cells of Desulfitobacterium frappieri PCP-1 have thus far been reported to be capable of phenyl methyl ether O-demethylation. This present study is the first report of Desulfitobacteria utilizing phenyl methyl ethers as electron donors for fumarate reduction and for growth.

Keywords

Desulfitobacterium hafniense Desulfitobacterium sp. strain PCE-S Reductive dehalogenation O-demethylation O-demethylase Phenyl methyl ether Vanillate Syringate Fumarate reduction Dehalorespiration 

Abbreviations

PCE

Tetrachloroethene

TCE

Trichloroethene

DCE

cis-1,2-Dichloroethene

ClOHPA

3-Cl-4-Hydroxyphenylacetate

OHPA

4-Hydroxyphenylacetate

FH4

Tetrahydrofolate

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anke Neumann
    • 2
  • Tina Engelmann
    • 1
  • Roland Schmitz
    • 1
  • Yvonne Greiser
    • 1
  • Adelheid Orthaus
    • 1
  • Gabriele Diekert
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für MikrobiologieFSU JenaJenaGermany
  2. 2.Engler-Bunte-InstitutUniversität Karlsruhe (TH)KarlsruheGermany