Osteoporosis International

, Volume 25, Issue 3, pp 795–805

Maternal vitamin D status in pregnancy and offspring bone development: the unmet needs of vitamin D era

  • S. N. Karras
  • P. Anagnostis
  • E. Bili
  • D. Naughton
  • A. Petroczi
  • F. Papadopoulou
  • D. G. Goulis
Review

DOI: 10.1007/s00198-013-2468-5

Cite this article as:
Karras, S.N., Anagnostis, P., Bili, E. et al. Osteoporos Int (2014) 25: 795. doi:10.1007/s00198-013-2468-5

Abstract

Data from animal and human studies implicate maternal vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy as a significant risk factor for several adverse outcomes affecting maternal, fetal, and child health. The possible associations of maternal vitamin D status and offspring bone development comprise a significant public health issue. Evidence from randomized trials regarding maternal vitamin D supplementation for optimization of offspring bone mass is lacking. In the same field, data from observational studies suggest that vitamin D supplementation is not indicated. Conversely, supplementation studies provided evidence that vitamin D has beneficial effects on neonatal calcium homeostasis. Nevertheless, a series of issues, such as technical difficulties of current vitamin D assays and functional interplay among vitamin D analytes, prohibit arrival at safe conclusions. Future studies would benefit from adoption of a gold standard assay, which would unravel the functions of vitamin D analytes. This narrative review summarizes and discusses data from both observational and supplementation studies regarding maternal vitamin D status during pregnancy and offspring bone development.

Keywords

ComplicationsFetusMotherPregnancyVitamin D deficiency

Copyright information

© International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. N. Karras
    • 1
    • 4
  • P. Anagnostis
    • 1
  • E. Bili
    • 1
  • D. Naughton
    • 2
  • A. Petroczi
    • 2
  • F. Papadopoulou
    • 3
  • D. G. Goulis
    • 1
  1. 1.Unit of Reproductive Endocrinology, First Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical SchoolAristotle University of ThessalonikiThessalonikiGreece
  2. 2.Schools of Life SciencesKingston UniversityLondonUK
  3. 3.Unit of Endocrinology-DiabetesAgios Pavlos General HospitalThessalonikiGreece
  4. 4.Unit of Reproductive Endocrinology, First Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology“Papageorgiou” General HospitalThessalonikiGreece