Osteoporosis International

, Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 265–272

Physical activity as determinant of femoral neck strength relative to load in adult women: findings from the hip strength across the menopause transition study

  • T. Mori
  • S. Ishii
  • G. A. Greendale
  • J. A. Cauley
  • B. Sternfeld
  • C. J. Crandall
  • W. Han
  • A. S. Karlamangla
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00198-013-2429-z

Cite this article as:
Mori, T., Ishii, S., Greendale, G.A. et al. Osteoporos Int (2014) 25: 265. doi:10.1007/s00198-013-2429-z

Abstract

Summary

Our objective was to examine associations of physical activity in different life domains with peak femoral neck strength relative to load in adult women. Greater physical activity in each of the domains of sport, active living, home, and work was associated with higher peak femoral neck strength relative to load.

Introduction

Our objective was to examine the associations of physical activity in different life domains with peak femoral neck strength relative to load in adult women. Composite indices of femoral neck strength integrate body size with femoral neck size and bone mineral density to gauge bone strength relative to load during a fall, and are inversely associated with incident fracture risk.

Methods

Participants were 1,919 pre- and early perimenopausal women from the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation. Composite indices of femoral neck strength relative to load in three failure modes (compression, bending, and impact) were created from hip dual-energy X-ray absorption scans and body size. Usual physical activity within the past year was assessed with the Kaiser Physical Activity Survey in four domains: sport, home, active living, and work. We used multiple linear regression to examine the associations.

Results

Greater physical activity in each of the four domains was independently associated with higher composite indices, adjusted for age, menopausal transition stage, race/ethnicity, Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation study site, smoking status, smoking pack-years, alcohol consumption level, current use of supplementary calcium, current use of supplementary vitamin D, current use of bone-adverse medications, prior use of any sex steroid hormone pills or patch, prior use of depo-provera injections, history of hyperthyroidism, history of previous adult fracture, and employment status: standardized effect sizes ranged from 0.04 (p < 0.05) to 0.20 (p < 0.0001).

Conclusions

Physical activity in each domain examined was associated with higher peak femoral neck strength relative to load in pre- and early perimenopausal women.

Keywords

Active livingComposite strength indicesFemoral neck strength relative to loadPeak bone strengthPhysical activity

Copyright information

© International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Mori
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. Ishii
    • 3
  • G. A. Greendale
    • 2
  • J. A. Cauley
    • 4
  • B. Sternfeld
    • 5
  • C. J. Crandall
    • 6
  • W. Han
    • 2
  • A. S. Karlamangla
    • 2
  1. 1.Geriatric Research Education and Clinical CenterVA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare SystemLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Department of Medicine/Division of GeriatricsDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLALos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.Department of Geriatric Medicine, Graduate School of MedicineUniversity of TokyoBunkyo-kuJapan
  4. 4.Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public HealthUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  5. 5.Division of ResearchKaiser PermanenteOaklandUSA
  6. 6.Department of Medicine/Division of General Internal Medicine and Health Services ResearchDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLALos AngelesUSA