Osteoporosis International

, Volume 23, Issue 5, pp 1645–1650

Osteoid osteoma is an osteocalcinoma affecting glucose metabolism

Authors

    • Department of Genetics and Development, College of Physicians and SurgeonsColumbia University
    • Department of Rheumatology, Hospices Civils de LyonINSERM UMR 1033, Université de Lyon
  • O. Borel
    • Department of Rheumatology, Hospices Civils de LyonINSERM UMR 1033, Université de Lyon
  • F. Lee
    • Department of Orthopedic Surgery, College of Physicians and SurgeonsColumbia University
  • G. Vaz
    • Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hospices Civils de LyonUniversité de Lyon
  • M. Guyard
    • Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hospices Civils de LyonUniversité de Lyon
  • C. Fadat
    • Department of Rheumatology, Hospices Civils de LyonINSERM UMR 1033, Université de Lyon
  • M.-C. Carlier
    • Hospices Civils de Lyon, Fédération de Biochimie, Groupement Hospitalier Sud
  • R. Chapurlat
    • Department of Rheumatology, Hospices Civils de LyonINSERM UMR 1033, Université de Lyon
  • G. Karsenty
    • Department of Genetics and Development, College of Physicians and SurgeonsColumbia University
Case Report

DOI: 10.1007/s00198-011-1684-0

Cite this article as:
Confavreux, C.B., Borel, O., Lee, F. et al. Osteoporos Int (2012) 23: 1645. doi:10.1007/s00198-011-1684-0

Abstract

Osteocalcin is a hormone secreted by osteoblasts, which regulates energy metabolism by increasing β-cell proliferation, insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity, and energy expenditure. This has been demonstrated in mice, but to date, the evidence implicating osteocalcin in the regulation of energy metabolism in humans are indirect. To address this question more directly, we asked whether a benign osteoblastic tumor, such as osteoma osteoid in young adults, may secrete osteocalcin. The study was designed to assess the effect of surgical resection of osteoid osteoma on osteocalcin and blood glucose levels in comparison with patients undergoing knee surgery and healthy volunteers. Blood collections were performed the day of surgery and the following morning after overnight fasting. Patients and controls were recruited in the orthopedic surgery department of New York Presbiterian Hospital, NY-USA and Hospices Civils de Lyon, France. Seven young males were included in the study: two had osteoid osteoma, two underwent knee surgery, and three were healthy volunteers. After resection of the osteoid osteomas, we observed a decrease of osteocalcin by 62% and 30% from the initial levels. Simultaneously, blood glucose increased respectively by 32% and 15%. Bone turnover markers were not affected. This case study shows for the first time that osteocalcin in humans affects blood glucose level. This study also suggests that ostoid osteoma may be considered, at least in part, as an osteocalcinoma.

Keywords

Adenoma Blood glucose Endocrine tumor Osteocalcin Osteoid osteoma

Copyright information

© International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2011