, Volume 23, Issue 2, pp 607-614
Date: 11 Mar 2011

Hypovitaminosis D as a risk factor of hip fracture severity

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Abstract

Summary

In a cross-sectional study including 324 patients older than 65 years admitted to our hospital for osteoporotic hip fracture, we found that those patients with a more severe vitamin D deficiency had more severe osteoporotic hip fractures (Garden grades III–IV and Kyle III–IV).

Introduction

To identify possible differences in baseline characteristics of patients with different types of osteoporotic hip fracture.

Methods

Cross-sectional study including consecutive individuals over 65 admitted to our hospital for osteoporotic hip fracture over a year. Demographic data, fracture type, comorbidities, history of osteoporosis, functional capacity, nutritional status and vitamin D storage were evaluated.

Results

We included 324 patients (83 ± 7 years, 80% women). Two hundred sixteen patients (67%) had vitamin D deficiency (25OHD3 <25 ng/ml). In patients with severe femoral neck or intertrochanteric fractures (Garden III–IV and Kyle III–IV), vitamin D deficiency was more frequent (74%) and severe (25OHD3 20 ± 15 ng/ml) than in patients with less severe fractures (57%, 25OHD3 26 ± 21 ng/ml). Forty-three percent of patients had previous fractures. Only 15% of patients had been previously diagnosed with osteoporosis and 10% were receiving treatment. Patients receiving vitamin D supplements have higher 20OHD3 levels and less severe fractures.

Conclusions

Although vitamin D levels are not different between patients with intracapsular or extracapsular hip fractures, a more severe vitamin D deficiency seems to be associated to more severe osteoporotic hip fractures. A prior vitamin D supplementation could avoid a higher severity of these fractures.