Osteoporosis International

, Volume 22, Issue 1, pp 327–337

Green tea polyphenols attenuate deterioration of bone microarchitecture in female rats with systemic chronic inflammation

  • C.-L. Shen
  • J. K. Yeh
  • C. Samathanam
  • J. J. Cao
  • B. J. Stoecker
  • R. Y. Dagda
  • M.-C. Chyu
  • D. M. Dunn
  • J.-S. Wang
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00198-010-1209-2

Cite this article as:
Shen, C., Yeh, J.K., Samathanam, C. et al. Osteoporos Int (2011) 22: 327. doi:10.1007/s00198-010-1209-2

Abstract

Summary

Green tea polyphenols (GTP) are promising agents for preventing bone loss. GTP supplementation sustained microarchitecture and improved bone quality via a decrease in inflammation. Findings suggest a significant role for GTP in skeletal health of patients with chronic inflammation.

Introduction

This study evaluated whether GTP can restore bone microstructure along with a molecular mechanism in rats with chronic inflammation. A 2 [placebo vs. lipopolysaccharide (LPS)]× 2 [no GTP vs. 0.5% GTP (w/v) in drinking water] factorial design was employed.

Methods

Female rats were assigned to four groups: placebo, LPS, placebo + GTP, and LPS + GTP for 12 weeks. Efficacy was evaluated by examining changes in bone microarchitecture using histomorphometric and microcomputed tomographic analyses and by bone strength using the three-point bending test. A possible mechanism was studied by assessing the difference in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) expression in tibia using immunohistochemistry.

Results

LPS lowered trabecular volume fraction, thickness, and bone formation in proximal tibia while increasing osteoclast number and surface perimeter in proximal tibia and eroded surface in endocortical tibial shafts. GTP increased trabecular volume fraction and number in both femur and tibia and periosteal bone formation rate in tibial shafts while decreasing trabecular separation in proximal tibia and eroded surface in endocortical tibial shafts. There was an interaction between LPS and GTP in trabecular number, separation, bone formation, and osteoclast number in proximal tibia, and trabecular thickness and number in femur. GTP improved the strength of femur, while suppressing TNF-α expression in tibia.

Conclusion

In conclusion, GTP supplementation mitigated deterioration of bone microarchitecture and improved bone integrity in rats with chronic inflammation by suppressing bone erosion and modulating cancellous and endocortical bone compartments, resulting in a larger net bone volume. Such a protective role of GTP may be due to a suppression of TNF-α.

Keywords

Bone qualityDietary supplementHistomorphometryInflammationMicro-CTTea

Copyright information

© International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • C.-L. Shen
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. K. Yeh
    • 3
  • C. Samathanam
    • 1
  • J. J. Cao
    • 4
  • B. J. Stoecker
    • 5
  • R. Y. Dagda
    • 1
  • M.-C. Chyu
    • 1
    • 6
    • 7
  • D. M. Dunn
    • 1
  • J.-S. Wang
    • 8
  1. 1.Department of PathologyTexas Tech University Health Sciences CenterLubbockUSA
  2. 2.Laura W. Bush Institute for Women’s HealthTexas Tech University Health Sciences CenterLubbockUSA
  3. 3.Applied Bench Core LaboratoryWinthrop-University HospitalMineolaUSA
  4. 4.USDA ARS Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research CenterGrand ForksUSA
  5. 5.Nutritional SciencesOklahoma State UniversityStillwaterUSA
  6. 6.Department of Mechanical EngineeringTexas Tech UniversityLubbockUSA
  7. 7.Graduate Healthcare Engineering OptionTexas Tech UniversityLubbockUSA
  8. 8.Department of Environmental Health ScienceUniversity of Georgia, AthensAthensUSA