Osteoporosis International

, Volume 22, Issue 1, pp 249–254

Patterns of treatment in Australian men following fracture

Authors

  • R. Otmar
    • Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences: Barwon HealthThe University of Melbourne
  • M. J. Henry
    • Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences: Barwon HealthThe University of Melbourne
  • M. A. Kotowicz
    • Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences: Barwon HealthThe University of Melbourne
  • G. C. Nicholson
    • Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences: Barwon HealthThe University of Melbourne
  • S. Korn
    • Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences: Barwon HealthThe University of Melbourne
    • Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences: Barwon HealthThe University of Melbourne
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00198-010-1204-7

Cite this article as:
Otmar, R., Henry, M.J., Kotowicz, M.A. et al. Osteoporos Int (2011) 22: 249. doi:10.1007/s00198-010-1204-7

Abstract

Summary

This study aimed to describe treatment initiation rates for men who had recently sustained a fracture. Most (75.9%) men potentially eligible for subsidised treatment at the time of fracture remained untreated even after a subsequent fracture.

Introduction

This study aimed to describe treatment initiation rates for men who had recently sustained a fracture.

Methods

The study was conducted as part of the Geelong Osteoporosis Study in south-eastern Australia. Men in the study area who had sustained an incident fracture in the period July 2006 to December 2007 were identified from hospital radiology reports. A self-report questionnaire was sent to eligible participants approximately 12 months after fracture. Respondents were asked for details of medications prescribed for ‘osteoporosis/fracture/low bone mass’ before and after fracture, and where applicable, reasons for cessation of treatment. We analysed the results for 109 men aged 50 years and older who had sustained fracture in the study period.

Results

Most (75.9%) men potentially eligible for subsidised treatment at the time of fracture remained untreated. Of the 87 men who were untreated, nine had osteoporosis at the hip and/or spine and 29 (26.6%) reported having sustained a low trauma prior fracture.

Conclusions

Our findings are consistent with previously published data showing low rates of treatment initiation in men eligible for osteoporosis treatment. There appear to be barriers involving participants’ and medical practitioners’ knowledge, beliefs and attitudes regarding osteoporosis and treatment, as well as in the doctor–patient partnership in osteoporosis management. Establishment of clinical pathways for fracture management beyond orthopaedic care may be one of a range of appropriate responses.

Keywords

Fragility fractureMenOsteopeniaOsteoporosisTreatment initiation

Copyright information

© International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2010