Osteoporosis International

, Volume 21, Issue 5, pp 713–722

The need for a transparent, ethical, and successful relationship between academic scientists and the pharmaceutical industry: a view of the Group for the Respect of Ethics and Excellence in Science (GREES)

  • O. Bruyere
  • J. A. Kanis
  • M.-E. Ibar-Abadie
  • N. Alsayed
  • M. L. Brandi
  • N. Burlet
  • D. L. Cahall
  • A. Chines
  • J.-P. Devogelaer
  • W. Dere
  • N. Goel
  • N. Hughes
  • J.-M. Kaufman
  • S. Korte
  • B. H. Mitlak
  • D. Niese
  • R. Rizzoli
  • L. C. Rovati
  • J.-Y. Reginster
Position Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00198-010-1190-9

Cite this article as:
Bruyere, O., Kanis, J.A., Ibar-Abadie, M. et al. Osteoporos Int (2010) 21: 713. doi:10.1007/s00198-010-1190-9

Abstract

Summary

This paper provides recommendations for fair and unbiased relationship between academic scientists and the pharmaceutical industry.

Introduction

Real or perceived problems in the relationship between academics and the industry have been the subject of much recent debate. It has been suggested that academic clinicians should sever all links with the industry—a view that is rarely challenged.

Methods

Academic experts and members of the pharmaceutical industry were invited to an expert consensus meeting to debate this topic. This meeting was organized by the Group for the Respect of Ethics and Excellence in Science. Conflict of interest, competing interest, right and duties of academic scientist, authorship, and staff and student education were discussed.

Results

Guidelines for a transparent, ethical, strong, and successful partnership between the academic scientist and the pharmaceutical industry have been provided.

Conclusions

The Group support interactions between the industry and clinicians provided that it is transparent and ethical.

Keywords

Competing interestConflict of interestEthicsGhost authorshipMedical education

Copyright information

© International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • O. Bruyere
    • 1
  • J. A. Kanis
    • 2
  • M.-E. Ibar-Abadie
    • 3
  • N. Alsayed
    • 4
  • M. L. Brandi
    • 5
  • N. Burlet
    • 6
  • D. L. Cahall
    • 7
  • A. Chines
    • 8
  • J.-P. Devogelaer
    • 9
  • W. Dere
    • 10
  • N. Goel
    • 11
  • N. Hughes
    • 10
  • J.-M. Kaufman
    • 12
  • S. Korte
    • 13
  • B. H. Mitlak
    • 14
  • D. Niese
    • 13
  • R. Rizzoli
    • 15
  • L. C. Rovati
    • 16
  • J.-Y. Reginster
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Public Health, Epidemiology and Health EconomicsUniversity of LiegeLiegeBelgium
  2. 2.WHO Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone DiseasesUniversity of Sheffield Medical SchoolSheffieldUK
  3. 3.ParisFrance
  4. 4.Sanofi-Pasteur MSDLyonFrance
  5. 5.Department of Internal MedicineUniversity of FlorenceFlorenceItaly
  6. 6.International Osteoporosis FoundationNyonSwitzerland
  7. 7.Sanofi-aventisBridgewaterUSA
  8. 8.Wyeth PharmaceuticalsCollegevilleUSA
  9. 9.Saint-Luc University HospitalUniversite catholique de LouvainBruxellesBelgium
  10. 10.Amgen SwitzerlandZugSwitzerland
  11. 11.UCB PharmaRochesterUSA
  12. 12.Department of EndocrinologyGhent University HospitalGhentBelgium
  13. 13.NovartisBaselSwitzerland
  14. 14.Eli Lilly and CompanyNew YorkUSA
  15. 15.Department of Rehabilitation and GeriatricsGeneva University Hospitals and Faculty of MedicineGenevaSwitzerland
  16. 16.RottapharmMonzaItaly