Osteoporosis International

, Volume 20, Issue 10, pp 1725–1733

Effect of impact exercise on bone metabolism

  • A. Vainionpää
  • R. Korpelainen
  • H. K. Väänänen
  • J. Haapalahti
  • T. Jämsä
  • J. Leppäluoto
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00198-009-0881-6

Cite this article as:
Vainionpää, A., Korpelainen, R., Väänänen, H.K. et al. Osteoporos Int (2009) 20: 1725. doi:10.1007/s00198-009-0881-6

Abstract

Summary

Regular impact exercise in premenopausal women caused positive osteogenic effects associated to low basal serum parathormone (PTH) but had no effects on bone turnover markers PINP or TRACP5b. The low serum basal PTH levels during impact exercise may be a sign of increased incorporation of calcium to bone.

Introduction

This study aimed to determine the long-term effects of high-impact exercise on bone turnover and calciotropic hormones.

Methods

We performed a 12-month population-based, randomized, controlled exercise trial in 120 women (age 35–40 years) randomly assigned to an exercise group (EG; n = 60) or a control group (CG; n = 60). The exercise regimen consisted of supervised high-impact exercises three times per week. Daily impact loading was assessed by using an accelerometer. Bone turnover markers and calciotropic hormones were analyzed at 0, 6, and 12 months.

Results

Twelve months of impact exercise did not reveal any treatment effects in bone turnover markers PINP or TRAPC5b, whereas serum basal PTH decreased significantly more in the EG than in the CG (−11.2 vs. −2.2 pg/mL; p = 0.03). The change in PTH was dose dependent and most clearly seen in subjects with 96 to 130 daily impacts at 2.5 to 5.3 g (e.g., running or jumping).

Conclusions

Regular impact exercise does not cause persistent alterations in bone turnover emphasizing necessity of continuous training to achieve bone benefits. Impact exercise training lowers the serum basal PTH levels and possibly enables greater difference between the basal PTH and transient exercise-induced PTH peaks leading to osteogenic effects.

Keywords

AccelerometerBiochemical markersBone metabolismDose responsePhysical activityPTHRCT

Copyright information

© International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Vainionpää
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 7
    • 8
  • R. Korpelainen
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  • H. K. Väänänen
    • 5
  • J. Haapalahti
    • 6
  • T. Jämsä
    • 1
  • J. Leppäluoto
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Medical Technology, Institute of BiomedicineUniversity of OuluOuluFinland
  2. 2.Department of Physiology, Institute of BiomedicineUniversity of OuluOuluFinland
  3. 3.Department of Sports and Exercise MedicineDeaconess Institute of OuluOuluFinland
  4. 4.Institute of Health SciencesUniversity of Oulu and Oulu University HospitalOuluFinland
  5. 5.Institute of BiomedicineUniversity of TurkuTurkuFinland
  6. 6.Orion Diagnostica, R&DOuluFinland
  7. 7.Department of Physical Medicine and RehabilitationSeinäjoki Central HospitalSeinäjokiFinland
  8. 8.Department of Medical TechnologyUniversity of OuluOuluFinland