Osteoporosis International

, 20:723

Hip fracture in the elderly: does counting time from fracture to surgery or from hospital admission to surgery matter when studying in-hospital mortality?

Authors

    • Social and Preventive Medicine DepartmentState University of Campinas
    • Home Care DepartmentAlbert Einstein Hospital
  • D. C. Moreira-Filho
    • Social and Preventive Medicine DepartmentState University of Campinas
  • C. M. Coeli
    • Institute of Studies on Public HealthFederal University of Rio de Janeiro
  • K. R. Camargo Jr.
    • Social Medicine InstituteState University of Rio de Janeiro
  • F. B. Fukushima
    • Anesthesiology DepartmentState University of São Paulo
  • R. Blais
    • Health Administration DepartmentUniversity of Montreal
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00198-008-0757-1

Cite this article as:
Vidal, E.I.O., Moreira-Filho, D.C., Coeli, C.M. et al. Osteoporos Int (2009) 20: 723. doi:10.1007/s00198-008-0757-1

Abstract

Summary

This study aims to analyze whether the interval from hospital admission to surgery may be used as a surrogate of the actual gap from fracture to surgery when investigating in-hospital hip fracture mortality. After analyzing 3,754 hip fracture admissions, we concluded that those intervals might be used interchangeably without misinterpretation bias.

Introduction

The debate regarding the influence of time to surgery in hip fracture (HF) mortality is one of the most controversial issues in the HF medical literature. Most previous investigations actually analyzed the time from hospital admission to surgery as a surrogate of the less easily available gap from fracture to surgery. Notwithstanding, the assumption of equivalency between those intervals remains untested.

Methods

We analyzed 3,754 hospital admissions of elderly patients due to HF in Quebec, Canada. We compared the performance as predictors of in-hospital mortality of the delay from admission to surgery and the actual gap from fracture to surgery using univariate and multiple logistic regression analysis.

Results

The mean times from fracture to surgery and from admission to surgery were 1.84 and 1.02 days (P < 0.001), respectively. On univariate logistic regression, both times were slightly significant as mortality predictors, yielding similar odds ratios of 1.08 (P < 0.001) for time from fracture to surgery and 1.11 (P < 0.001) for time from admission to surgery. After accounting for other covariates, neither times remained significant mortality predictors.

Conclusion

The gap from admission to surgery may be used as a surrogate of the actual delay from fracture to surgery when studying in-hospital HF mortality.

Keywords

ElderlyHip fractureMortalityOsteoporosisTime to surgery

Copyright information

© International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2008