Original Article

Osteoporosis International

, Volume 20, Issue 2, pp 245-255

Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and bone mineral density among Hispanic men

  • A. B. AraujoAffiliated withNew England Research Institutes Email author 
  • , T. G. TravisonAffiliated withNew England Research Institutes
  • , G. R. EscheAffiliated withNew England Research Institutes
  • , M. F. HolickAffiliated withSection of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine
  • , T. C. ChenAffiliated withSection of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine
  • , J. B. McKinlayAffiliated withNew England Research Institutes

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Abstract

Summary

There are few data on the skeletal health of Hispanic men. We observed differences in vitamin D deficiency and low BMD between Hispanic ethnic subgroups that persisted with adjustment for risk factors. Our data indicate a substantial burden of low BMD and vitamin D deficiency among Hispanic men.

Introduction

Disparities within ethnic groups are generally ignored, but in evolving populations they may have implications for public health. We examined ethnic variation in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and bone mineral density (BMD) among Hispanic American men.

Methods

Three hundred and fifty-eight Hispanic males 30 to 79 years of age were studied. Logistic regression models assessed variation in odds of vitamin D deficiency (<20 ng/mL) and low BMD (T-score<−1) by ethnicity, with and without adjustment for risk factors (age, smoking, occupation, physical activity, body mass index, and sunlight exposure).

Results

Vitamin D deficiency was most common among Puerto Rican (26%), compared with Dominican (21%), Central American (11%), and South American (9%) men. Percentages with low BMD were: South American (44%), Puerto Rican (34%), Dominican (29%), and Central American (23%). Adjustment for age and risk factors failed to account for Hispanic subgroup differences in vitamin D deficiency and low BMD. Population estimates indicate a substantial burden of low BMD and vitamin D deficiency among Hispanic men.

Conclusions

Our findings underscore the importance of examining the skeletal health of Hispanic subgroups, and suggest that a considerable number of Hispanic men may be at elevated risk of fracture and vitamin D deficiency.

Keywords

Bone densitometry Epidemiology Hispanic Men Population study Vitamin D