, Volume 19, Issue 8, pp 1139-1145
Date: 18 Dec 2007

Trend of hip fracture incidence in Germany 1995–2004: a population-based study

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Abstract

Summary

We analyzed hip fracture incidence trends in Germany 1995-2004, using national hospital discharge register. Crude incidences per 100,000 increased from 121.2 (95% CI 120.5-121.9) in 1995 to 140.9 (140.2-141.7) in 2004. Age-sex-adjusted annual incidence ratios showed a statistically significant, but only slight increase (1.01, p < 0.01), compared to higher rises in the past. Trends differed markedly with sex, age, and regions.

Introduction

Data concerning actual trends of the hip fracture incidence and differences for sex, age, and region are limited. We analyzed hip fracture incidence trends in Germany 1995-2004, using the national hospital discharge register. Crude incidences per 100,000 increased from 121.2 (95% CI 120.5-121.9) in 1995 to 140.9 (140.2-141.7) in 2004. Age-sex-adjusted annual incidence ratios showed a statistically significant, but only slight increase (1.01, p < 0.01), compared to higher rises in the past. Trends differed markedly with sex, age, and regions.

Methods

Analysis of annual hip fracture incidences using the national hospital discharge register. Estimate of age-sex-adjusted changes was found by using Poisson regression (incidence rate ratios, IRR).

Results

The number of patients with at least one hospital admission for hip fracture increased (1995: n = 99,141; 2004: n = 116,281). Crude incidences per 100,000 were 121.2 (95% confidence interval 120.5-121,9) and 140.9 (140.2-141.7), respectively. The age-sex-adjusted hip fracture incidence increased statistically significantly, but only slightly (IRR per year: 1.01; 1.00-1.01; IRR 1995-2004: 1.05, p < 0.01). In men aged 40 years or older, incidences increased. In women, there was a tendency of a decrease up to 74 years of age, but also a significant increase in higher age groups. In people 0-39 years, the incidence declined markedly (IRR 1995-2004, men 0.74; 0.69-0.79, women 0.62; 0.55-0.69, both p < 0.01). The increase was significantly higher in Eastern compared to Western Germany (interaction: p = 0.002), and differences between East and West decreased.

Conclusions

In contrast to earlier years, the hip fracture incidence in Germany 1995-2004 increased only slightly, with a decline in younger people, but increases in older ages, particularly in men. Regional differences decreased.