Osteoporosis International

, Volume 19, Issue 7, pp 919–927

Fall-related self-efficacy, not balance and mobility performance, is related to accidental falls in chronic stroke survivors with low bone mineral density

Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00198-007-0519-5

Cite this article as:
Pang, M.Y.C. & Eng, J.J. Osteoporos Int (2008) 19: 919. doi:10.1007/s00198-007-0519-5

Abstract

Summary

Chronic stroke survivors with low hip bone density are particularly prone to fractures. This study shows that fear of falling is independently associated with falls in this population. Thus, fear of falling should not be overlooked in the prevention of fragility fractures in these patients.

Introduction

Chronic stroke survivors with low bone mineral density (BMD) are particularly prone to fragility fractures. The purpose of this study was to identify the determinants of balance, mobility and falls in this sub-group of stroke patients.

Methods

Thirty-nine chronic stroke survivors with low hip BMD (T-score <−1.0) were studied. Each subject was evaluated for the following: balance, mobility, leg muscle strength, spasticity, and fall-related self-efficacy. Any falls in the past 12 months were also recorded. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify the determinants of balance and mobility performance, whereas logistic regression was used to identify the determinants of falls.

Results

Multiple regression analysis revealed that after adjusting for basic demographics, fall-related self-efficacy remained independently associated with balance/mobility performance (R2 = 0.494, P < 0.001). Logistic regression showed that fall-related self-efficacy, but not balance and mobility performance, was a significant determinant of falls (odds ratio: 0.18, P = 0.04).

Conclusions

Fall-related self-efficacy, but not mobility and balance performance, was the most important determinant of accidental falls. This psychological factor should not be overlooked in the prevention of fragility fractures among chronic stroke survivors with low hip BMD.

Keywords

Bone density Cerebrovascular accident Falls Fractures Rehabilitation Self-efficacy 

Copyright information

© International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Rehabilitation SciencesHong Kong Polytechnic UniversityHung HomChina
  2. 2.Department of Physical Therapy and Graduate Program in Rehabilitation SciencesUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  3. 3.Rehabilitation Research LaboratoryGF Strong CentreVancouverCanada