Osteoporosis International

, Volume 16, Issue 12, pp 2025–2030

Incidence rates and life-time risk of hip fractures in Mexicans over 50 years of age: a population-based study

  • Patricia Clark
  • Pilar Lavielle
  • Francisco Franco-Marina
  • Esperanza Ramírez
  • Jorge Salmerón
  • John A. Kanis
  • Steven R. Cummings
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00198-005-1991-4

Cite this article as:
Clark, P., Lavielle, P., Franco-Marina, F. et al. Osteoporos Int (2005) 16: 2025. doi:10.1007/s00198-005-1991-4

Abstract

The vast majority of hip fractures in the 21st century will occur in the developing countries. The rates and life-time hip fracture risk are not known for Mexico, and for this reason, we studied the incidence of hip fractures, and the remaining life-time probability of having a hip fracture at the age of 50 years in Mexican men and women. All hip fracture cases registered during the year 2000 were collected at all the main tertiary-care hospitals in the two major health systems in México City, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS) and Ministry of Health (SS), and the diagnosis was validated by chart review in all cases. The annual rates of hip fracture were 169 in women and 98 in men per 100,000 person-years. The life-time probability of having a hip fracture at 50 years of age was 8.5% in Mexican women and 3.8% in Mexican men. We conclude that hip fractures are an important health problem in Mexico and that Mexican health authorities should consider public health programs to prevent hip fractures.

Keywords

EpidemiologyHip fracturesLife-time riskMéxicoPopulation studiesPrevalence

Copyright information

© International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia Clark
    • 1
    • 7
  • Pilar Lavielle
    • 1
  • Francisco Franco-Marina
    • 2
  • Esperanza Ramírez
    • 3
  • Jorge Salmerón
    • 4
  • John A. Kanis
    • 5
  • Steven R. Cummings
    • 6
  1. 1.Clinical Epidemiology UnitCMN Siglo XXI IMSS-Faculty of MedicineMexico CityMexico
  2. 2.Faculty of MedicineUNAMMexico CityMexico
  3. 3.Centro Nacional de Rehabilitación SSMexico CityMexico
  4. 4.Epidemiology and Health Services Research UnitCuernavacaMexico
  5. 5.WHO Collaborating Center for Metabolic Bone DiseasesUniversity of Sheffield Medical SchoolSheffieldUK
  6. 6.Coordinating Center UCSFSan FranciscoUSA
  7. 7.University of California at San Diego, School of MedicineDepartment of Family and Preventive MedicineLa JollaUSA