Osteoporosis International

, Volume 16, Issue 11, pp 1397–1403

The characteristics of fractures in Polish adolescents aged 16–20 years

  • Jerzy Konstantynowicz
  • Irena Bialokoz-Kalinowska
  • Radoslaw Motkowski
  • Pawel Abramowicz
  • Janina Piotrowska-Jastrzebska
  • Jerzy Sienkiewicz
  • Ego Seeman
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00198-005-1850-3

Cite this article as:
Konstantynowicz, J., Bialokoz-Kalinowska, I., Motkowski, R. et al. Osteoporos Int (2005) 16: 1397. doi:10.1007/s00198-005-1850-3

Abstract

The aim of the study was to identify associations between fractures in childhood and family, anthropometric and lifestyle factors. Among 1,246 subjects aged 16.3–20.6 years (539 boys, 707 girls), based on a questionnaire, 869 were fracture-free while 377 (30.26%) had fractures. Of those reporting fractures, 146 reported multiple fractures (12% of studied population, 39% of all fractures). More boys had fractures than girls (35.6% vs 24.9%, p < 0.001). Fracture sites included: forearm (37%), fingers (23%) wrist (16%), ankle (14%), humerus (10%), tibia (8%) clavicle (7%) and femoral shaft / neck (3%). Among adolescents with multiple fractures, 52% also reported fractures in at least one family member, compared with 29% of those without a fracture history. Fractures in siblings and mothers (but not fathers) accounted for 44% of the liability in adolescents’ fractures. Subjects with multiple fractures reported more time at the computer than those without fractures and reported more time participating in team sports, and 18.6% avoided milk, whereas 12.4% of those without fractures reported milk-free diets. Using a logistic regression model, none of the lifestyle factors, except for computer use, were independently associated with fractures. Fractures, particularly multiple fractures, are common in childhood and adolescence. Familial clustering of fractures suggests shared genetic and environmental factors are responsible.

Keywords

AdolescentsFamily historyFracturesMultiple fractures

Copyright information

© International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jerzy Konstantynowicz
    • 1
    • 3
  • Irena Bialokoz-Kalinowska
    • 1
  • Radoslaw Motkowski
    • 1
  • Pawel Abramowicz
    • 1
  • Janina Piotrowska-Jastrzebska
    • 1
  • Jerzy Sienkiewicz
    • 2
  • Ego Seeman
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Pediatrics and AuxologyChildren’s Hospital Dr. L. Zamenhof, Medical University of BialystokBialystokPoland
  2. 2.Department of Public HealthMedical University of BialystokBialystokPoland
  3. 3.Department of Endocrinology and MedicineUniversity of Melbourne, Austin Health and Reparation Medical CenterHeidelbergAustralia