Osteoporosis International

, Volume 16, Issue 9, pp 1057–1064

Improvement of nutrition stimulates bone mineral gain in Japanese school children and adolescents

Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00198-004-1804-1

Cite this article as:
Hirota, T., Kusu, T. & Hirota, K. Osteoporos Int (2005) 16: 1057. doi:10.1007/s00198-004-1804-1

Abstract

Calcium supplementation could accelerate bone mineral accrual, but the effect of other dietary factors in children is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine associations of changes in diet with bone accrual in Japanese children. All female (n=262) and male (n=286) school children aged 10–15 years living in a small town were recruited. We measured bone status at the os calcis using quantitative ultrasound (QUS) and assessed diet and other lifestyle factors using questionnaires annually for 5 years. The greatest increase in QUS values was observed between ages 11–13 years in boys and girls and peak bone status was attained typically by age 14–15 years (~2 years since menarche) in girls and 1–2 years later in boys. Initial bone status adjusted by height and weight in 10-year-old or 11-year-old children was associated positively with intake of small fish and dairy products, and negatively with age of menarche in girls, and negatively with preference for meat in boys. Annual increase in QUS bone status in girls age 10 years or 11 years was associated positively with increased intake of fish, fruit, vegetables, soybeans, and intake of milk products and negatively with preference for meat. Annual increase in QUS bone status in boys was associated positively with increased height and weight, increased intake of small fish and vegetables, intake of dairy products, and awareness of bone measurement. Thus, a dietary change incorporating an increased intake of fish, fruit, vegetables, and soy products could lead to higher bone QUS values in children.

Keywords

Calcium intakeChildren and adolescentsFish intakeFruit and vegetablesPeak bone massQuantitative ultrasound

Copyright information

© International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Research LaboratoryTsuji Academy of NutritionOsaka-cityJapan
  2. 2.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyNissay HospitalOsaka-cityJapan