Original Article

International Urogynecology Journal

, Volume 12, Issue 6, pp 361-365

Sexual Function in Women with and without Urinary Incontinence and/or Pelvic Organ Prolapse

  • G. R. RogersAffiliated withDepartment of Obstetrics & Gynecology, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, 2211 Lomas Blvd NE, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
  • , A. VillarrealAffiliated withDepartment of Obstetrics & Gynecology, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, 2211 Lomas Blvd NE, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
  • , D. Kammerer-DoakAffiliated withDepartment of Obstetrics & Gynecology, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, 2211 Lomas Blvd NE, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
  • , C. QuallsAffiliated withDepartment of Obstetrics & Gynecology, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, 2211 Lomas Blvd NE, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA

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Abstract

The sexual function of women with and without urinary incontinence and/or pelvic organ prolapse (UI/POP) was compared using a condition-specific validated questionnaire, the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire (PISQ). Eighty-three women with UI/POP and 56 without agreed to participate. PISQ scores were significantly lower among women with UI/POP than in those without (P = 0.003). No differences in the stages of sexual excitement were noted between groups. The frequency of intercourse was less with UI/POP than without (P = 0.04). Women with UI/POP restricted sexual activity for fear of losing urine more frequently than did those without (P= 0.005). No differences were reported in patients’ or partners’ sexual satisfaction. This study found that women with UI/POP have poorer sexual functioning than those without, as measured by the PISQ, and report less frequent sexual activity. In addition, women with UI/POP are more likely to restrict sexual activity for fear of incontinence, although they report similar levels of satisfaction with their sexual relationships as do women without UI/POP.

Key words:Prolapse – Sexual function – Urinary incontinence