, Volume 25, Issue 6, pp 811-815
Date: 22 Jan 2014

Long-term follow-up after colpocleisis: regret, bowel, and bladder function

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Abstract

Introduction and hypothesis

Colpocleisis is not a popular option amongst surgeons, possibly due to concern about long-term regret. This study assessed a cohort of women who underwent colpocleisis 2–5 years previously to determine the regret rate, the effect on quality of life (QOL) and bladder and bowel function.

Methods

This was a longitudinal study of patients who underwent colpocleisis at least 2 years previously. Participants were asked to complete the Prolapse QOL (P-QOL), International Consultation on Incontinence–Urinary Incontinence (ICIQ-UI Short Form) and Colorectal Anal Distress Inventory questionnaires (CRADI). Two additional questions were asked: (1) Do you regret having vaginal closure surgery for prolapse? (never, sometimes, often, all the time), and (2) Would you recommend this surgery to a relative or friend who is not sexually active? (yes, no.)

Results

Thirty-four women were identified. Six had died by the time of follow-up, and five declined to answer the questionnaires because of ill health. Twenty-three women responded (67 %). Mean age was 78.68 years. One woman regretted having had the surgery, as the colpocleisis had failed. Twenty-one women (91.3 %) would recommend this surgery; one would not (4.3 %), and another was not sure (4.5 %). Low P-QOL [8 (0–37) ± 9.41), ICIQ-UI (7 (0–17) ± 5.44) and CRADI (10; 0–28 ± 8.13] scores suggest a positive impact on QOL, bladder and bowel function.

Conclusion

In this cohort, colpocleisis produced a good outcome with low regret rate (4.3 %), good QOL and minimal effect on bladder and bowel function at 2–5 years.