International Urogynecology Journal

, Volume 21, Issue 11, pp 1397–1404

LOX family enzymes expression in vaginal tissue of premenopausal women with severe pelvic organ prolapse

Authors

    • Division of Urogynecology and Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery, Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyMount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto
    • Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyUniversity of Toronto
    • Samuel Lunenfeld Research InstituteMount Sinai Hospital
  • Maria AT Bortolini
    • Division of Urogynecology and Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery, Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyMount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto
    • Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyUniversity of Toronto
  • Harold Drutz
    • Division of Urogynecology and Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery, Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyMount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto
    • Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyUniversity of Toronto
  • Stephen Lye
    • Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyUniversity of Toronto
    • Samuel Lunenfeld Research InstituteMount Sinai Hospital
  • Oksana Shynlova
    • Samuel Lunenfeld Research InstituteMount Sinai Hospital
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00192-010-1199-9

Cite this article as:
Alarab, M., Bortolini, M.A., Drutz, H. et al. Int Urogynecol J (2010) 21: 1397. doi:10.1007/s00192-010-1199-9

Abstract

Introduction and Hypothesis

The extracellular matrix proteins collagen and elastin provide tissue strength and resilience, whereas lysyl oxidase enzymes play a major role in their stabilization. This study examines the expression and tissue localization of lysyl oxidase family proteins in the anterior vaginal wall of premenopausal women with advanced pelvic organ prolapse (POP, n = 15) and asymptomatic controls (n = 11). All women were in the proliferative phase of menstrual cycle.

Methods

Total mRNAs and proteins extracted from the vaginal tissue were examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting, and tissue specimens were analyzed by immunohistochemistry.

Results

The expression of LOX, LOXL1, and LOXL3 genes as well as LOX and LOXL3 proteins were significantly reduced in POP patients (P < 0.05). Immunolocalization of LOX family proteins was confirmed in all vaginal specimens.

Conclusion

We proposed that reduced expression of LOX enzymes may result in defective assembly of pelvic tissues and development of POP.

Keywords

ECM LOX enzymes POP Premenopausal Vagina

Copyright information

© The International Urogynecological Association 2010