International Urogynecology Journal

, Volume 19, Issue 6, pp 805–810

Predictors of successful voiding before hospital discharge after urinary stress incontinence surgery

  • Sallie Oliphant
  • Ödül Aktan Amburgey
  • AnnaMarie Connolly
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00192-007-0532-4

Cite this article as:
Oliphant, S., Amburgey, Ö.A. & Connolly, A. Int Urogynecol J (2008) 19: 805. doi:10.1007/s00192-007-0532-4

Abstract

This study aims to identify variables associated with successful voiding before hospital discharge in women undergoing urinary stress incontinence (USI) surgery. Medical records of women who underwent USI surgery between July 1997 and October 2005 were reviewed. Demographic, urodynamic, and perioperative data were recorded. The primary outcome was successful voiding at hospital discharge. Univariate, bivariate, and logistic regression analyses were performed (SPSS 12.0/SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA). The two groups, successful vs unsuccessful voiders, were similar in age, postmenopausal status, and prior hysterectomy/incontinence/prolapse surgery. Burch colposuspension was performed in 82% and pubovaginal sling in 18% of women. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that age < 45 years (OR 2.6), sustained detrusor contraction (OR 4.4), and Burch colposuspension (OR 2.9) were positively associated with early successful voiding. Early successful voiding was associated with age < 45 years, sustained detrusor contraction, and Burch colposuspension. These data may facilitate preoperative counseling in women undergoing USI surgery.

Keywords

Successful post-operative voiding Urinary incontinence surgery 

Copyright information

© International Urogynecology Journal 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sallie Oliphant
    • 1
  • Ödül Aktan Amburgey
    • 1
  • AnnaMarie Connolly
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Urogynecology/Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of MedicineUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA
  2. 2.Division of Urogynecology/Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery, Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA

Personalised recommendations