Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy

, Volume 17, Issue 3, pp 266–269

A pyogenic, ruptured Baker’s cyst induced by arthroscopic pressure pump irrigation

Authors

    • Division of Knee Surgery and Sports Traumatology, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and TraumatologyUniversity Hospital Leuven
    • Division of Knee Surgery and Sports Traumatology, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and TraumatologyUniversity Hospital Pellenberg
  • Hilde Vandenneucker
    • Division of Knee Surgery and Sports Traumatology, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and TraumatologyUniversity Hospital Leuven
  • Peter Reynders
    • Division of Knee Surgery and Sports Traumatology, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and TraumatologyUniversity Hospital Leuven
  • Stefaan Nijs
    • Division of Knee Surgery and Sports Traumatology, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and TraumatologyUniversity Hospital Leuven
  • Theo Pittevils
    • Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryZiekenhuis Oost-Limburg
  • Johan Bellemans
    • Division of Knee Surgery and Sports Traumatology, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and TraumatologyUniversity Hospital Leuven
Knee

DOI: 10.1007/s00167-008-0679-7

Cite this article as:
Corten, K., Vandenneucker, H., Reynders, P. et al. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc (2009) 17: 266. doi:10.1007/s00167-008-0679-7

Abstract

Post-steroid septic arthritis can be treated with irrigation pump assisted arthroscopic synovectomy. The high-intra-articular fluid pressures can force the pyogenic fluid into a pre-existing Baker’s cyst. The cyst can rupture and with the pre-existing steroid induced immune-suppression, the calf abscess will be hard to control. Therefore, thorough investigation with an ultrasound-guided aspiration followed by an early drainage of the collection is warranted and mandatory. Close monitoring for the development of a deep thrombosis of the popliteal vein is required.

Keywords

Pyogenic baker's cystSteroid injection

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008