Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy

, Volume 15, Issue 9, pp 1137–1143

Glenohumeral motion: review of measurement techniques

Authors

  • A. M. Hill
    • Shoulder Bioengineering Group, Department of BioengineeringImperial College London, Sir Leon Bagrit Centre
    • Shoulder Bioengineering Group, Department of BioengineeringImperial College London, Sir Leon Bagrit Centre
  • R. J. Dallalana
    • Shoulder UnitHospital of St. John and St. Elizabeth
  • A. L. Wallace
    • Shoulder Bioengineering Group, Department of BioengineeringImperial College London, Sir Leon Bagrit Centre
    • Shoulder UnitHospital of St. John and St. Elizabeth
  • G. R. Johnson
    • School of Mechanical and Systems Engineering, Centre for Rehabilitation and Engineering StudiesUniversity of Newcastle upon Tyne
Shoulder

DOI: 10.1007/s00167-007-0318-8

Cite this article as:
Hill, A.M., Bull, A.M.J., Dallalana, R.J. et al. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthr (2007) 15: 1137. doi:10.1007/s00167-007-0318-8

Abstract

Measurement of upper limb motion is problematic, not least because of the large range of path dependent description of motion of the joints, and the multiple non-cyclical unstandardised motion tasks measured. Furthermore, appreciation of shoulder motion specifically is obscured by overlying soft tissue. In order to satisfy the complexity of a clinically useful model of the movement of the joint, input data must be acquired from a set of pre-determined movements using a non-invasive technique with a high level of accuracy. Descriptive and predictive modeling of the glenohumeral joint requires input of high-fidelity data into a 6 degree of freedom representation, without which, the application of the tool is of limited clinical significance to the advancement of both operative and non-operative management of shoulder pathology. Electromagnetic, linkage and radiographic techniques have previously been used, however, an optimal solution is yet to be described.

Keywords

KinematicsShoulderTrackingMeasurement

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007