Intensive care medicine research agenda on cardiac arrest

  • Jerry P. Nolan
  • Robert A. Berg
  • Stephen Bernard
  • Bentley J. Bobrow
  • Clifton W. Callaway
  • Tobias Cronberg
  • Rudolph W. Koster
  • Peter J. Kudenchuk
  • Graham Nichol
  • Gavin D. Perkins
  • Tom D. Rea
  • Claudio Sandroni
  • Jasmeet Soar
  • Kjetil Sunde
  • Alain Cariou
Research Agenda

DOI: 10.1007/s00134-017-4739-7

Cite this article as:
Nolan, J.P., Berg, R.A., Bernard, S. et al. Intensive Care Med (2017). doi:10.1007/s00134-017-4739-7

Abstract

Over the last 15 years, treatment of comatose post-cardiac arrest patients has evolved to include therapeutic strategies such as urgent coronary angiography with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), targeted temperature management (TTM)—requiring mechanical ventilation and sedation—and more sophisticated and cautious prognostication. In 2015, collaboration between the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) and the European Society for Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM) resulted in the first European guidelines on post-resuscitation care. This review addresses the major recent advances in the treatment of cardiac arrest, recent trials that have challenged current practice and the remaining areas of uncertainty.

Keywords

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation Cardiac arrest Basic life support Advanced life support Post-resuscitation care Prognostication 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg and ESICM 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jerry P. Nolan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Robert A. Berg
    • 3
    • 4
  • Stephen Bernard
    • 5
  • Bentley J. Bobrow
    • 6
  • Clifton W. Callaway
    • 7
  • Tobias Cronberg
    • 8
  • Rudolph W. Koster
    • 9
  • Peter J. Kudenchuk
    • 10
  • Graham Nichol
    • 11
  • Gavin D. Perkins
    • 12
  • Tom D. Rea
    • 13
  • Claudio Sandroni
    • 14
  • Jasmeet Soar
    • 15
  • Kjetil Sunde
    • 16
    • 17
  • Alain Cariou
    • 18
  1. 1.School of Clinical SciencesUniversity of BristolBristolUK
  2. 2.Anaesthesia and Intensive Care MedicineRoyal United HospitalBathUK
  3. 3.Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Russell Raphaely Endowed Chair of Critical Care MedicineThe Children’s Hospital of PhiladelphiaPhiladelphiaUSA
  4. 4.Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Perelman School of MedicineThe University of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  5. 5.Ambulance VictoriaVictoriaAustralia
  6. 6.Department of Emergency MedicineUniversity of Arizona College of MedicineTucsonUSA
  7. 7.Department of Emergency MedicineUniversity of Pittsburgh School of MedicinePittsburghUSA
  8. 8.Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, NeurologySkane University Hospital, Lund UniversityLundSweden
  9. 9.Department of CardiologyAcademic Medical CenterAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  10. 10.Division of Cardiology, Department of MedicineUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  11. 11.University of Washington-Harborview Center for Prehospital Emergency CareUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  12. 12.Critical Care Medicine, Warwick Medical School and Heart of England NHS Foundation TrustUniversity of WarwickCoventryUK
  13. 13.University of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  14. 14.Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive CareCatholic University School of MedicineRomeItaly
  15. 15.Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, North Bristol NHS TrustSouthmead HospitalBristolUK
  16. 16.Department of Anaesthesiology, Division of Emergencies and Critical CareOslo University HospitalOsloNorway
  17. 17.Institute of Clinical MedicineUniversity of OsloOsloNorway
  18. 18.Medical ICU, Cochin Hospital (AP-HP), Paris-Cardiovascular-Research-Centre, INSERM U970 (Sudden Death Expertize Centre)Université Paris-Descartes-Sorbonne-Paris-CitéParisFrance

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