Intensive Care Medicine

, Volume 39, Issue 11, pp 2003–2010

Potentially harmful effects of inspiratory synchronization during pressure preset ventilation

  • J. C. M. Richard
  • A. Lyazidi
  • E. Akoumianaki
  • S. Mortaza
  • R. L. Cordioli
  • J. C. Lefebvre
  • N. Rey
  • L. Piquilloud
  • G. F. Sferrazza-Papa
  • A. Mercat
  • L. Brochard
Original

DOI: 10.1007/s00134-013-3032-7

Cite this article as:
Richard, J.C.M., Lyazidi, A., Akoumianaki, E. et al. Intensive Care Med (2013) 39: 2003. doi:10.1007/s00134-013-3032-7

Abstract

Purpose

Pressure preset ventilation (PPV) modes with set inspiratory time can be classified according to their ability to synchronize pressure delivery with patient’s inspiratory efforts (i-synchronization). Non-i-synchronized (like airway pressure release ventilation, APRV), partially i-synchronized (like biphasic airway pressure), and fully i-synchronized modes (like assist-pressure control) can be distinguished. Under identical ventilatory settings across PPV modes, the degree of i-synchronization may affect tidal volume (VT), transpulmonary pressure (PTP), and their variability. We performed bench and clinical studies.

Methods

In the bench study, all the PPV modes of five ventilators were tested with an active lung simulator. Spontaneous efforts of −10 cmH2O at rates of 20 and 30 breaths/min were simulated. Ventilator settings were high pressure 30 cmH2O, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) 15 cmH2O, frequency 15 breaths/min, and inspiratory to expiratory ratios (I:E) 1:3 and 3:1. In the clinical studies, data from eight intubated patients suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and ventilated with APRV were compared to the bench tests. In four additional ARDS patients, each of the PPV modes was compared.

Results

As the degree of i-synchronization among the different PPV modes increased, mean VT and PTP swings markedly increased while breathing variability decreased. This was consistent with clinical comparison in four ARDS patients. Observational results in eight ARDS patients show low VT and a high variability with APRV.

Conclusion

Despite identical ventilator settings, the different PPV modes lead to substantial differences in VT, PTP, and breathing variability in the presence spontaneous efforts. Clinicians should be aware of the possible harmful effects of i-synchronization especially when high VT is undesirable.

Keywords

Pressure preset ventilationARDSAPRVBIPAP

Abbreviations

APRV

Airway pressure release ventilation

ARDS

Acute respiratory distress syndrome

BIPAP

Biphasic positive airway pressure

CV

Coefficient of variation

I:E

Inspiratory to expiratory ratio

ICU

Intensive care unit

PAC

Pressure assist control

PEEP

Positive end-expiratory pressure

PMUS

Muscular pressure

PPV

Pressure preset ventilation

PS

Pressure support

PTP

Transpulmonary pressure

RRSPONT

Spontaneous respiratory rate

SD

Standard deviation

VT

Tidal volume

VMSPONT

Minute ventilation attributed to spontaneous breathing activity

VMTOT

Total minute ventilation

Supplementary material

134_2013_3032_MOESM1_ESM.docx (535 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 534 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg and ESICM 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. C. M. Richard
    • 1
    • 2
    • 5
  • A. Lyazidi
    • 1
    • 2
  • E. Akoumianaki
    • 1
  • S. Mortaza
    • 3
  • R. L. Cordioli
    • 1
    • 4
  • J. C. Lefebvre
    • 1
  • N. Rey
    • 1
  • L. Piquilloud
    • 3
  • G. F. Sferrazza-Papa
    • 1
  • A. Mercat
    • 3
  • L. Brochard
    • 1
    • 2
    • 6
  1. 1.Intensive Care UnitUniversity Hospital of GenevaGenève 14Switzerland
  2. 2.School of MedicineUniversity of GenevaGenevaSwitzerland
  3. 3.Intensive Care UnitUniversity Hospital of AngersAngersFrance
  4. 4.Hospital Israelita Albert EinsteinSão PauloBrazil
  5. 5.UPRESS EA 38 30Hôpital Universitaire de RouenRouenFrance
  6. 6.INSERM Unit 955, Team 13University Paris-EstCréteilFrance