Intensive Care Medicine

, Volume 36, Issue 8, pp 1286–1298

The endothelium: physiological functions and role in microcirculatory failure during severe sepsis

Authors

    • Inserm U970, PAris Research Cardiovascular Center (PARCC)
    • Service de Réanimation MédicaleHôpital Saint-Antoine, AP-HP
    • Service de Réanimation MédicaleHôpital Saint-Antoine
  • E. Maury
    • Service de Réanimation MédicaleHôpital Saint-Antoine, AP-HP
    • Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, UMR S707
    • Inserm U707
  • S. Lehoux
    • Lady Davis Institute for Medical ResearchMcGill University
  • B. Guidet
    • Service de Réanimation MédicaleHôpital Saint-Antoine, AP-HP
    • Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, UMR S707
    • Inserm U707
  • G. Offenstadt
    • Service de Réanimation MédicaleHôpital Saint-Antoine, AP-HP
    • Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, UMR S707
    • Inserm U707
Review

DOI: 10.1007/s00134-010-1893-6

Cite this article as:
Ait-Oufella, H., Maury, E., Lehoux, S. et al. Intensive Care Med (2010) 36: 1286. doi:10.1007/s00134-010-1893-6

Abstract

The endothelium is a highly dynamic cell layer that is involved in a multitude of physiological functions, including the control of vascular tone, the movement of cells and nutrients, the maintenance of blood fluidity and the growth of new vessels. During severe sepsis, the endothelium becomes proadhesive, procoagulant, antifibrinolytic and is characterized by alterations of vasomotor regulation. Most of these functions have been discovered using in vitro and animal models, but in vivo exploration of endothelium in patients remains difficult. New tools to analyze endothelial dysfunction at bedside have to be developed.

Keywords

Endothelium Sepsis Coagulation Cytokines

Copyright information

© Copyright jointly held by Springer and ESICM 2010