Intensive Care Medicine

, Volume 35, Issue 6, pp 1068–1074

Carbon dioxide monitoring during long-term noninvasive respiratory support in children

  • Rebeca Paiva
  • Uros Krivec
  • Guillaume Aubertin
  • Emmanuelle Cohen
  • Annick Clément
  • Brigitte Fauroux
Original

DOI: 10.1007/s00134-009-1408-5

Cite this article as:
Paiva, R., Krivec, U., Aubertin, G. et al. Intensive Care Med (2009) 35: 1068. doi:10.1007/s00134-009-1408-5

Abstract

Introduction

Routine monitoring of noninvasive respiratory support relies on nocturnal pulse oximetry and daytime arterial blood gases, without systematic nocturnal carbon dioxide recording. The aim of the study was to assess if overnight pulse oximetry and daytime blood gases are sufficiently accurate to detect nocturnal hypoventilation in children receiving long-term noninvasive respiratory support.

Materials and methods

Pulse oximetry and carbon dioxide pressure measured by capillary arterialized blood gases and a combined transcutaneous carbon dioxide and pulse oximetry (PtcCO2/SpO2) monitor were compared in 65 patients (asthma, n = 16, recurrent bronchitis, n = 8, lung infection, n = 8, cystic fibrosis, n = 15, interstitial lung disease, n = 6, neuromuscular disease, n = 12). Daytime capillary arterialized blood gases and nocturnal recording of pulse oximetry and carbon dioxide by means of a combined PtcCO2/SpO2 monitor were performed in 50 other patients receiving nocturnal noninvasive respiratory support at home.

Results

A correlation was observed between pulse oximetry (r = 0.832, P < 0.0001) and carbon dioxide pressure (r = 0.644, P < 0.0001) measured by capillary arterialized blood gases and the combined PtcCO2/SpO2 monitor. Twenty-one of the 50 patients (42%) on long-term noninvasive respiratory support presented nocturnal hypercapnia, defined by a PtcCO2 value >50 mmHg, without nocturnal hypoxemia. Daytime capillary arterialized carbon dioxide levels were normal in 18 of these 21 patients.

Conclusions

Nocturnal hypercapnia may occur in children receiving nocturnal noninvasive respiratory support at home. Nocturnal pulse oximetry and daytime arterial blood gases are not sufficiently accurate to diagnose nocturnal hypercapnia, underlying the importance of a systematic carbon dioxide monitoring in children receiving noninvasive respiratory support.

Keywords

Carbon dioxideNoninvasive positive pressure ventilationChildArterial blood gases

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rebeca Paiva
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  • Uros Krivec
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Guillaume Aubertin
    • 3
  • Emmanuelle Cohen
    • 4
  • Annick Clément
    • 3
    • 4
  • Brigitte Fauroux
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Pediatric Pulmonary DepartmentExequiel Gonzalez Cortes HospitalSantiagoChili
  2. 2.Unit for Pulmonary Diseases, Division of PediatricsUniversity Medical CenterLjubljanaSlovenia
  3. 3.Pediatric Pulmonary Department, AP-HP, Hôpital Armand Trousseau, Research Unit INSERM UMR-S 893 Equipe 12Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris6ParisFrance
  4. 4.INSERM UMR S-893 Equipe 12Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris6ParisFrance